Angie's Corner

Posts in the fitness category

Forget About Resolutions: Set Goals

by Angie Miller

Angie Miller

“The new year stands before us, like a chapter in a book, waiting to be written. We can help write that story by setting goals.” ― Melody Beattie, The Language of Letting Go: Daily Meditations on Codependency.

In her book, Codependent No More, Beattie addresses the difference between and New Year’s Resolutions and New Year’s Goals. Her emphasis is on the fact that resolutions are often short term, rarely do they last; but goals give us direction and help us lead a purposeful life. Goals are meant to be impactful, something we work toward to make our lives better in the here and now and over the course of time. Goals help us begin each day with intention and they build our self-esteem. For every goal we accomplish, we realize our potential and we are inspired by our own success. Undeniably, goals are the impetus for change.

Beattie suggests that in order to get started, we need to ask ourselves a series of questions. I couldn’t agree more. I believe that questions, and the process of seeking answers, helps us to lead a happy, fulfilling life. Questions inspire us to take stock, and they make us aware of our surroundings. As we look for answers, we pay close attention to the opportunities around us to learn and grow.

Here are some suggested questions:

What do you want to happen in your life this year? Think in terms of friendship, family, and love.
What do you want to happen in your career?
What would you like to do or accomplish?
Where would you like to grow?
What would like to change?
What problems would you like to solve?
What decisions would you like to make?

What obstacles might get in the way? (This is huge! You have to know your barriers, people or situations that get in the way of you achieving your goals. You also have to recognize your own behaviors and actions that get in the way.)

As you ask these questions, along with any others you can come up with, write down your answers. Be sure to let your thoughts flow, without judgment or self doubt.

After you brainstorm, categorize your goals into short-term and long-term goals. Short terms goals might include daily goals and weekly goals, while long-term goals might take you a month, two months, or even a year or more to accomplish. For long-term goals, be sure to break them down into smaller, more manageable steps, such as daily and weekly objectives to keep you on track and prevent you from taking on too much too soon. Remember, slow and steady wins the race. Anything worth accomplishing is going to take hard work, dedication, and patience.

Three of Beattie’s additional suggestions for success:

1. Turn everything into a goal. Everything we’d like to do accomplish or change should be turned into a goal. Nothing is too big or too small. Maybe we want a new career, or a higher salary; but first we’d like to plan a vacation to clear our head. Remember, one of the best ways to build self-esteem is to turn everyday tasks into goals; therefore every task that you accomplish is one more reason to celebrate.

2. Write your goals on paper. Writing your goals on paper makes them more concrete. There is a level of commitment when you see something on paper and you can reference it for inspiration. More importantly, writing down your goals keeps you focused.

3. Check off your goals once you reach them. Checking off your goals gives you a sense of accomplishment. It allows you to recognize that you have the ability to set your mind to something and accomplish it. If you don’t achieve your goal by the date you set, reevaluate. The main reason we don’t achieve our goals is that we don’t break them down, we expect to accomplish them too soon, or we don’t have a concrete plan for how to get to there.

Keep in mind that things happen when the time is right, but sometimes the right time is when you set your mind to something and you have a plan for how and when to make it happen. May today be the start of a new year, and many new goals.
Best to you in 2015!
Sincerely,

- Angie

Angie Miller is the star and creator of the Bedroom Body™ Workout and other top selling exercise DVD’s. Passionate about fitness and education, Angie teaches at Northern Illinois University and is a Certification Specialist for the Aerobic and Fitness Association of America (AFAA). She is a freelance writer, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and proud mom. Learn more about Angie at: http://www.angiemillerfitness.com

 

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Exercises for a Healthy Back


by Angie Miller

Angie Miller

Does back pain hold you back from fitness activities that you enjoy? If so, you’re not alone. Americans spend more than 86 billion dollars each year treating back pain symptoms, according to current research. Occasional back discomfort isn’t foreign to most of us, but chronic back pain can cause severe limitations in daily living activities as well as physical exercise. Certain risk factors, such as muscle imbalances, poor posture, obesity, stress, and excessive sitting can increase our risk for lower back pain. Whether we have jobs that require us to work at a computer all day, or be on our feet, more than likely all of us could benefit from exercises that build a strong, healthy back.

 The four exercises below are designed to stretch and strengthen the back, as well the surrounding muscles, such as the abdominals, muscles of the pelvis, and gluteal muscles. The exercises are easy to perform, but very effective, whether you’re a novice or an advanced exerciser.

 Recommended Repetitions: Approximately 8-12 repetitions per exercise. Hold each repetition for approximately 10 to 30 seconds.

When you’ve mastered that, you can increase your repetitions, and/or your hold time.

Safety Tip: If you've injured your back, have chronic back pain, or other health conditions such as osteoporosis consult your doctor before doing these exercises.

Exercise #1: Cat Stretch-

How to Do It: Start in a quadruped position with your hands below your shoulders and knees below your hips. Back should be flat and head in line with your spine. Breathe in through your nose, and as you exhale drop your head and look back toward your knees while rounding your upper back toward the ceiling.

Tip: Hold each repetition for 10 to 30 seconds.

Muscles Targeted: Erector Spinae, Trapezius

 

Exercise #2: Opposite Arm/Leg Extensions-

How to Do It: Start in a quadruped position with your hands below your shoulders and knees below your hips. Back should be flat and head in line with your spine. Extend your right arm out in front of you, then your left leg out behind you. Keep your arm and leg in a straight line with your spine.

Tip: Avoid lifting your arm and/or leg too high. This can cause your lower back to sway.

Tip: Your gaze should be down, but avoid lifting or dropping your head.

Tip: Create an invisible belt around your waist, so you co-contract your abdominals and lower back for a strong, stable center.

Tip: Hold on the extension for 10 to 30 seconds.

Muscles Targeted: Erector Spinae, Gluteus Maximus, Hamstrings, Rectus Abdominis

Exercise #3: Pelvic Tilt-

Lie on your back with your knees bent, feet flat on the floor. Bend at your elbows with your hands behind your head, letting your fingertips rest gently behind your ears. Breath in, letting the natural curve of your spine bring your lower back off the mat. As you exhale, tilt the bottom of your pelvis toward the ceiling, pulling our abdominals in and pressing your lower back against the floor.

Tip: Hold the tilt for about 10 to 30 seconds.

Muscles Targeted: Erector Spinae, Rectus Abdominis, Hip & Pelvic Stabilizers

 

Exercise #4: Bridge-

Lie on your back with your knees bent, feet flat on the floor. Arm rest gently at your sides. Inhale through your nose. As you exhale lift your hips off the ground, pressing your pelvis up toward the ceiling. Stop when your thighs and back are in a straight line.

Tip: Avoid hyperextending through the hips. This can cause your lower back to arch.

Tip: Keep your gaze up toward the ceiling and your neck neutral. Avoid tucking your chin into your chest.

Tip: Hold the bridge for 10 to 30 seconds.

Muscles Targeted: Erector Spinae, Gluteus Maximus, Hamstrings

 

 Wishing you a healthy back and a Happy Holiday.

- Angie

Angie Miller is the star and creator of the Bedroom Body™ Workout and other top selling exercise DVD’s. Passionate about fitness and education, Angie teaches at Northern Illinois University and is a Certification Specialist for the Aerobic and Fitness Association of America (AFAA). She is a freelance writer, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and proud mom. Learn more about Angie at: http://www.angiemillerfitness.com

 

By Collage Video | | Angie Miller, exercise, fitness, Weekly Blog, wellness | 0 comments | Read more

Arm Yourself for the Holidays Workout


by Angie Miller

 

Angie Miller

Whether it’s summer time fun or holiday festivities, we all want to bare arms that are strong and sculpted. This upper body workout gives you three exercises to strengthen and tone your biceps and triceps, along with interesting variations that challenge your balance and work your core.

Tip: Remember that exercise bands offer variable resistance, which means that the resistance changes throughout the range of motion. This keeps the movement dynamic and allows you to create the amount resistance you need. If you need the work to be harder, step further away from the anchored band so the pull is greater.

Tip: Make sure that your band doesn’t have any “rebound,” when you return to your start position. This means that you don't want there to be any slack in the band no matter where you are in the movement.

Equipment Needed: Resistance Band, (as well as a Sliding Glass Door or an Anchor for a Doorway). Wishing you lots of joy and good health during the holidays.

- Angie

Angie Miller is the star and creator of the Bedroom Body™ Workout and other top selling exercise DVD’s. Passionate about fitness and education, Angie teaches at Northern Illinois University and is a Certification Specialist for the Aerobic and Fitness Association of America (AFAA). She is a freelance writer, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and proud mom. Learn more about Angie at: http://www.angiemillerfitness.com

 

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What’s the Best Way To Refuel After Exercise?


by Angie Miller

Angie Miller

After a grueling boot camp, muscle conditioning, or cardio workout our muscles are depleted and in need of nutrition. The question is, how soon after we sweat should we be refueling? Post exercise hydration and nutrition needs are important considerations, and they play a key role in our ability to maximize the benefits we gain from our workout. Check out the questions and answers below for some important tips.

Is water the best choice or should we be reaching for sports drinks?

Proper fluid balance is essential for athletes as well as recreational exercisers. Dehydration can negatively impact performance, and when you don’t get enough fluids it can interfere with your body’s ability to maintain normal temperature. During most activities water is adequate in order to prevent dehydration. However, during endurance events or activities greater than 60 minutes, a sports drink may be necessary to enhance performance. The drink should contain carbohydrates to properly fuel the nervous and muscular systems.

How soon after exercise should we be eating a post-workout meal?

There is a window of opportunity, or “metabolic window,” that lasts approximately 60 to 90 minutes immediately following exercise, especially intense training. During this time, the body is most receptive to nutrient uptake and you have the best chance of reducing muscle damage. This window also allows you to maximize the muscle and strength gains from your workout.

Should the post-exercise meal be solid foods or a liquid meal replacement?

The moment you cease exercise the window of opportunity opens and from that time on the benefits begin to decrease. Because solid food can take approximately 2 to 3 hours to digest, it is not generally a recommended option as the window is closed by the time it’s digested. Although nutrition bars can be effective before and after exercise, liquid is generally recommended because of how quickly it is absorbed and nutrients are delivered to the muscles.

How important is post-exercise nutrition?

For most recreational exercisers post-workout feedings and snacks are not critical, but they can increase the potential benefits you receive from your workout, help you to prevent injury, fight fatigue, and avoid the stress of overtraining.

What is the bottom line answer when it comes to post-exercise meals?

While post recovery snacks and meals are important, they are not as significant to recreational exercisers as they are to endurance athletes. I always encourage my clients to remember that there’s research, there’s “ideal,” and then there’s real life. If you don’t fuel according the latest research that’s not to say that you won’t experience positive results. It is suggesting that you can improve your performance and get even better results when you fuel properly. My advice is to do the best you can in terms of health-conscious choices, not just post-recovery, but all the time, because you deserve to look and feel your best.

Best in Health,

Angie

Angie Miller is the star and creator of the Bedroom Body™ Workout and other top selling exercise DVD’s. Passionate about fitness and education, Angie teaches at Northern Illinois University and is a Certification Specialist for the Aerobic and Fitness Association of America (AFAA). She is a freelance writer, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and proud mom. Learn more about Angie at: http://www.angiemillerfitness.com

 

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Weightless Workout~ The Power of Bodyweight Training


by Angie Miller

Angie MillerAs bodyweight workouts rise in popularity, I often get asked about their effectiveness and their ability to deliver results. Personally, I think bodyweight training is the foundation of all training. Not only do I love the freedom and flexibility of weightless workouts, no equipment, no fuss, I love what they teach us about our body. When it’s just us against gravity we learn how to create resistance, and how to target every muscle group effectively simply by changing our body position. Bodyweight training teaches us how to manage and distribute our body weight, how to stabilize and strengthen our core, and how to use our gluteals for power and support. This gives us better body intuition that carries over into everything we do, in the gym and at home. Most importantly, without the added dimension of dumbbells, weighted bars, and other training tools, we can focus on proper form and technique, and just like dancers we can learn to move with grace and precision.

Here are of three of my favorite bodyweight exercises: All three exercises build upper body strength in your arms and shoulders, help you to stabilize and strengthen your core, improve your flexibility, and teach you to use your gluteals and legs for power and support.

1. Downward Facing Dog:

How to Do: Start in plank position with your body fully extended, hands directly below your shoulders, hips stable, and shoulders down and back. Engage your torso and lift your hips in the air, keeping your hands and feet in place so you stay long and extended.

Tip: Think about distributing your bodyweight so that your shoulders and wrists don’t feel any extra pressure. Engage through your center as if you’re wearing a belt. Lift your energy up through your spine and down the back of your legs, rooting into your heels.

Tip: Be sure to keep your neck long to avoid your shoulders sinking into your neck.

 

2. Side Plank:

How to Do: Start from front plank, then open up into a side plank, extending one arm up toward the ceiling.

Tip: Make sure that your support arm is directly below your shoulder. Be sure to keep your neck long and look up toward your extended arm. Stack your hips and shoulders, placing your body against an invisible wall behind you.

Tip: You can modify this exercise by bending your bottom leg and placing your knee on the floor. This helps take pressure off of your shoulders and wrists.

 

 

3. Tabletop:

How to Do: Start with your buttocks, feet, and hands on the floor, with fingertips facing your hips, feet are hip distance apart. Gently lift your hips and try to flatten your torso, engaging your center, pulling your chest open, and drawing your shoulder blades together.

Tip: Keep your head in line with your spine and don’t forget to breath. Really engage your gluteals here, using them for strength and support.

Tip: Tabletop opens your chest and strengthens your back, gluteals, and hamstrings, all three areas that are often overlooked and undertrained. This is great for your posture!

  

I hope you enjoy bodyweight training as much as I do. Here’s to good health, strong muscles, and amazing posture!

Sincerely,

Angie

Angie Miller is the star and creator of the Bedroom Body™ Workout and other top selling exercise DVD’s. Passionate about fitness and education, Angie teaches at Northern Illinois University and is a Certification Specialist for the Aerobic and Fitness Association of America (AFAA). She is a freelance writer, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and proud mom. Learn more about Angie at: http://www.angiemillerfitness.com

 

By Collage Video | | Angie Miller, exercise, fitness, goals, Weekly Blog, wellness | 0 comments | Read more

Building a Healthy Relationship with Your Body


by Angie Miller

Angie MillerI tell my clients that we should think of our body as our house. The outside of our house, that part that everyone sees, is like the foundation and the walls of our real house. It shelters and protects what’s inside, and is often a reflection of how we feel and how well we care for ourselves. Our skin, posture, physique, and even our expressions mirror how healthy we are on the inside, but they don’t tell the whole story. Those things that we cannot see, all the functions that make us unique and are essential to our health and well being, often suffer from our neglect. We depend on our personal house to protect us from illness and disease, but we don’t always care for it properly.

The reality is, we take pride in the home in which we live. No matter what it’s size, or whether it’s an apartment, duplex, or condo, it is personal to us. It’s our safe haven, and within those four walls are our memories from the past and our hopes for the future. But are we equally invested in caring for the home that represents our body? Do we take as much pride in our personal health? Do we exercise regularly, eat a balanced diet, sleep well, and get regular check ups? Would the house in which we live hold any meaning or value if we weren’t around to appreciate it?

I have come to the conclusion after more than 25 years of working in the fitness, education, and counseling professions, that we, especially women, would invest more in our personal house if we would spend less time focusing on what we don’t like and more time embracing it for all the wonder that it is. If we could see the big picture and realize what our body has done for us over the years: How many steps our feet have taken. How our legs have kept us standing despite the obstacles we have faced. How our hips, thighs, and abdominals give us our unique shape, and how they may be the bane of our existence, but in another person’s eyes signify the beauty and grace that makes us women. How our arms have embraced our children and the people we love, and lifted everything from the heavy load of life’s burdens to the powerful kettlebell we swing at the gym. How our neck and face may show our age, but thanks to good health we’ve made it to an age where those fine lines are a badge of honor, a sign of wisdom and experience.

What I’m trying to say is that personal acceptance is where it all begins. I am a living testament to this, and the fact that age has helped me make peace with my body. I am less judgmental and critical of its flaws because it’s those flaws that keep me humble and challenge me to work harder. I’m also more amazed by what my body is capable of and what it has done for me over the years. In the end, personal acceptance translates to us feeling worthy of the time and energy it takes to care for ourselves properly, and to make our physical, emotional, and intellectual health a priority. It allows us to come to terms with the fact that our body may have its flaws, but it’s a pretty amazing place to live. Most importantly, we realize that if we invest as much love and dedication into our personal house as we do the house in which we live we’ll be around longer to enjoy it. We’ll also be around longer to enjoy our kids, family, friends, significant other, and everything else that holds meaning and value in our lives.

- Angie

Angie Miller is the star and creator of the Bedroom Body™ Workout and other top selling exercise DVD’s. Passionate about fitness and education, Angie teaches at Northern Illinois University and is a Certification Specialist for the Aerobic and Fitness Association of America (AFAA). She is a freelance writer, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and proud mom. Learn more about Angie at: http://www.angiemillerfitness.com

 

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10-Minute Toner for the Legs and Gluteal Muscles


by Angie Miller

This exercise video shows you how to do a short lunge series with an exercise band. Lunges are great for toning and strengthening the legs and the gluteal muscles, and with the added resistance of a band you’ll get great results. If you don’t have an exercise band you can do bodyweight lunges, or hold hand weights instead.

Here are a few safety tips:

1. Try to bend your front knee 90 degrees, and be sure to keep your knee behind your toes.

2. My general rule of thumb is that less is more. If lunges hurt your knees, or you’re trying to get mobility back after an injury, just lower and lift a few inches. The main goal is to keep the joints mobile and the muscles strong and active.

3. Be sure to perform the same number of reps on each side, and try to look in a mirror to make sure that you are maintaining good form throughout the exercise.

Lunges are multi-muscle, multi-joint exercises that keep the heart pumping. They strengthen and tone everything from the torso down. If you are looking for time-efficient exercises, they are some of the best.

Sneak in this short workout while you’re on break at work, or right before dinner. Remember that exercise is movement, and you don’t have to set aside a full hour, or even a half hour at a time. You can get in a few segments throughout the day, five or ten minutes each, and everything adds up to give you the results you’re looking for.

Best in Health,

Angie

Angie Miller is the star and creator of the Bedroom Body™ Workout and other top selling exercise DVD’s. Passionate about fitness and education, Angie teaches at Northern Illinois University and is a Certification Specialist for the Aerobic and Fitness Association of America (AFAA). She is a freelance writer, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and proud mom. Learn more about Angie at: http://www.angiemillerfitness.com

 

By Collage Video | | Angie Miller, fitness, tips, Weekly Blog, wellness | 0 comments | Read more

Exercise and Weight Loss…. 5 Simple Steps to Success


by Angie Miller

Angie MillerSometimes in life things really are simpler than they seem. Exercise and weight loss might be one of those things. You don’t need the hottest diet on the market or even a degree in exercise science to figure it all out. If you want to establish a new exercise routine and lose those last 10 pounds, consider these simple steps…

1. Realize there’s one formula for weight loss… calories in vs. calories out! The quality of foods you eat and where your calories come from is important when it comes to body composition, energy level, and overall health and wellness, but ultimately when it comes to weight loss it boils down to one thing. You need to burn more calories than you consume.

2. Accept that there is no quick fix! You’ve heard this one time and time again, and sometimes you might wish it weren’t true. There’s no gadget, tool, machine, ball, or otherwise that can give you the body of your dreams without a lot of hard work, dedication, and perseverance on your part. The good news… I’ve never met a person who couldn’t do it once they set their mind to it.

3. Find activities that you enjoy. Just because your best friend claims to have lost 10 pounds taking her favorite indoor cycling class doesn’t mean it’s the answer for you. If you try the class several times and it doesn’t make your heart sing, move on. Investing time and energy into activities that you don’t enjoy is a surefire recipe for disaster. It won’t be long before doing laundry and picking the lint out of the dryer will seem like a better alternative. Find something that makes you want to get out of bed in the morning.

4. Be realistic and don’t overdo it. If you’ve never exercised in your life, or you haven’t exercised for an extended period of time, be realistic about the amount of time you are willing to invest in this new endeavor. Start gradually and work your way up. Diving into something head first is never a good idea, but diving into exercise too quickly can be downright dangerous. Sore muscles aside, you could risk burnout and possible injury.

5. Establish a routine…ASAP! Routines are good. They’re predictable, they give us a sense of control over our lives, and they allow us to manage our time more efficiently. Write out your exercise routine, post it on the fridge, and share it with family and friends. Make sure everyone knows that your exercise time is not something you’re willing to compromise. Encourage them to keep you accountable. Kids love doing this! You get to ask them if they did their homework, they get to ask you if you did your exercise.

In the end, it would be great if the pounds would melt off as easy as a chocolate bar melts in your mouth. But exercise and weight loss are like any skill or talent you have cultivated. You have to work hard and stay committed to experience success. That, and a positive, realistic approach, can be the perfect recipe for long-term health and happiness.

- Angie

Angie Miller is the star and creator of the Bedroom Body™ Workout and other top selling exercise DVD’s. Passionate about fitness and education, Angie teaches at Northern Illinois University and is a Certification Specialist for the Aerobic and Fitness Association of America (AFAA). She is a freelance writer, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and proud mom. Learn more about Angie at: http://www.angiemillerfitness.com

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Why Everyone Should Swing...

by Angie Miller

Angie Miller

…a kettlebell of course.

 

When it comes to time efficient workouts that deliver results, kettlebells can’t be beat. Kettlebells are a great cardiovascular and strength training workout that target your core and improve your balance and flexibility. They’re one of the most versatile, effective training tools for all over body conditioning.

How is kettlebell training different from regular strength training?

In kettlebell training you don’t isolate specific muscles. Instead you concentrate on movement patterns that incorporate the whole body. These types of movement patterns recruit more muscles and help you burn calories more efficiently. They’re functional, so they transfer to real life. Think about: removing luggage from a moving carousel, a dog pulling on a leash, holding the hand of a running child, and swinging grocery bags.

Another unique feature of the kettlebell is that the weight is offset from the handle, so it fluctuates throughout movement. This creates momentum, and it requires the stabilizing muscles of the core to control the momentum and manage the bell throughout the movement. This strengthens the entire torso, and it’s why kettlebells help us redistribute our weight and lose inches around our middle.

How safe is Kettlebell Training?
Kettlebell training, with proper instruction, is a safe, multifaceted way to train your entire body. In my Kettlebell Bootcamp DVD, I include a tutorial that breaks down some of the more common kettlebell exercises. Remember that practice is the mother of skill. With practice, we can improve our form and technique, as well as the overall condition of our body.

Order Angie's Kettlebell Bootcamp Here:


Q - What is one the most essential kettlebell exercises?
A - I love Double Arm Swings! Here’s a brief tutorial:

Double Arm Swings- With this exercise, you will send your hips back, load them up, and explode forward.  Begin by sitting back with the hips, knees slightly bent, chest open, and shoulders down and back.  The weight is in your heels, rooted to the ground. Swing the kettlebell back between the legs, snap your hips, and stand up tall, squeezing your glutes and extending your legs. Don’t try to lift the bell with your arms.  All the power comes from your hips. Breathing is important here. Take a deep inhale in through the nose on the way down, and forcefully exhale as the kettlebell comes up. You should not feel any pain in your lower back. If you do, check your form, and remember your breathing. 

Best in Health

Check back next week for more fitness tips and information, and feel free to reach out with any questions.

 

 

 

~Angie

Angie Miller is the star and creator of the Bedroom Body™ Workout and other top selling exercise DVD’s. Passionate about fitness and education, Angie teaches at Northern Illinois University and is a Certification Specialist for the Aerobic and Fitness Association of America (AFAA). She is a freelance writer, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and proud mom. Learn more about Angie at: http://www.angiemillerfitness.com

 

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Want great arms and a strong core?

Want great arms and a strong core? Try a Pushup!

by Angie Miller

Angie MillerA Pushup is a great functional move that works the chest while toning the arms and strengthening the core. It’s one of my favorite exercises because it’s a bodyweight move requiring no extra equipment. It’s just you against gravity, and that’s the foundation of all training. Bodyweight exercises improve our form and posture and increase our overall body awareness.

Pushups are one of the most versatile, effective bodyweight exercises; and the best part is that anyone can do them, from a novice to an advanced exerciser. If you’re new to pushups you can start by doing them against the wall. From there you can perform them on all fours with your hands below your shoulders and your knees below your hips. After you’ve mastered that, you can try them in a modified or full plank position, depending on your arm, shoulder, and core strength. There are endless options for pushups, and no matter how you incorporate them into your weekly routine I guarantee that pushups deliver results. It won’t take long before you’ll see amazing definition in your arms, your core will feel stronger, and you’ll walk taller.

Step One: Begin in plank position, either on your knees or on your toes. Place your hands a little wider than shoulder distance apart. Keep your hips level and your torso long and extended. Your head should be in line with your spine.

 

 

 

 

OR

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step Two: Bend at your elbows and lower your body toward the ground, ideally until your chest is a few inches from the floor. Make sure that your head is still an extension of your spine so you don't allow it to drop. Inhale as you go down.

Tip: Pretend you have a belt around your waist so your center will stay strong. You want to avoid letting your hips drop or your lower back sway.

Step Three: Once you have lowered your body as far as you can while still maintaining good form, slowly press back up, exhaling as you go. Be sure to keep your body in one straight line all throughout the movement.

Now that you have the 411 on pushups, feel free to drop and give me 20.

Check back next week for more fitness tips, ideas, and information.

~Angie


Angie Miller is the star and creator of the Bedroom Body™ Workout and other top selling exercise DVD’s. Passionate about fitness and education, Angie teaches at Northern Illinois University and is a Certification Specialist for the Aerobic and Fitness Association of America (AFAA). She is a freelance writer, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and proud mom. Learn more about Angie at: http://www.angiemillerfitness.com

 

By Collage Video | | Angie Miller, fitness, practice, tips, Weekly Blog | 0 comments | Read more
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