Love Notes by Jari Love

Benefits of Eating Clean

by Jari Love

What does it mean to eat clean? Here’s an even better question: What really happens to your body when you jump on the clean eating bandwagon?

 Clean eating is a buzzword that you have seen used by celebrities and thrown around in hashtags on Facebook. Simply put, clean eating means: Don’t eat crap. “Crap” may be defined as processed foods, grain-fed meats, dairy, starchy carbohydrates and sugar, depending on which diet you ascribe to.

 Clean eating can be as complicated as you make it. For me, clean eating translates to eating fresh, whole foods (with as many vegetables as possible), making every meal count with high-quality nutrients and, of course, cutting the crap.

 More than a year after drastically changing my diet, I can personally vouch for 10 unexpected clean eating “side effects”:

  1. Better mood

While I still struggle with mood swings at a certain time of the month, my overall outlook and general happiness have improved after cleaning up my diet. As Drew Ramsey, M.D., The Happiness Diet co-author and assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia University, explains in Yoga Journal, how you feel is directly affected by what you eat. He says, “Emotions begin in biology, with two nerve cells rubbing together, and those nerve cells are made of nutrients in food.”

  1. Boundless energy

Here’s all the proof you need: Even as a working mother of two toddlers, my energy soared after I quit eating processed foods. Devon D. Herndon, L.P.C.C., L.A.D.A.C., N.B.C.T., C.P.T., of BeMeBetter cites an energy boost as one of the prime outcomes of eating clean, saying, “If you are chronically exhausted or experience a post-lunch midday slump, it could very well be your diet. Diets that are high in refined sugar and carbs cause dramatic spikes in blood sugar. They might provide a temporary surge in energy, but it is followed by a crash.”

  1. Deeper sleep

Eat better, sleep deeper — what more can you ask for? The Balanced Brunette explains, “Vitamins and minerals found in whole foods will allow your body to regulate hormonal function throughout the day and promote deeper sleep at night. Eating healthy foods will also calm your nervous system and trigger a sleep-inducing hormonal response which helps you rest better at night.”

  1. Fewer cravings

From personal experience, I can tell you that clean eating takes a while to get used to, but the longer you do it, the better your body responds. Sugar and carbohydrate cravings may be a struggle at the outset, but months later, you’ll find it hard to muster up a taste for a sweet treat.

  1. Flat stomach

When asked about the good side effects of clean eating on the Bodybuilding forum, user Ayekay put feeling leaner and less bloated at the top of his list. In translation, if you want your pants to fit better, load up your plate with Mother Nature’s foods.

  1. Gorgeous hair

Looking for long, luscious locks that would make a Pantene model jealous? The Lean Clean Eating Machine says that plant-based foods are the secret — specifically, radishes, pumpkin seeds, dulse and carrots.

  1. Higher self-esteem

What are the pros of clean eating? One Redditor keeps it short and sweet: “I feel better about myself, [along with] knowing I’m getting all the goodness of micronutrients.”

  1. Perfect poop

Sorry, but I had to go there. As Wellness Mama points out, bowel movements are a prime indicator of your inner health. Clean eating yields cleaner poop with a digestive tract that is neither moving too fast nor too slow.

  1. Radiant skin

Your skin is the largest organ in your body, and refined sugar is its enemy. The Clean Eating Survival Guide stresses that a no sugar diet is the number one rule for a clear complexion.

  1. Raging libido

According to Cosmo, Gwyneth Paltrow attributed the state of her union to her clean living. Though dear Gwynnie is now consciously uncoupled, research still proves that nutrient-rich foods, like asparagus and watermelon, can help to heat things up in between the sheets.

 via sheknows.com

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

Steps to Eliminate Belly Fat for Good

by Jari Love

Belly fat is something that a lot of people complain about. Why? There are the obvious reasons, such as the fact that it is unattractive and unhealthy, and then there are the less obvious reasons. For instance, belly fat is some of the toughest fat to eliminate from the body.

When you start to understand how and why the body places fat around the abdominal area, however, it can help you to begin to get rid of it “for good”.

The body uses the calories or energy (same thing) that you consume in a few ways. The energy that it gets from fat is something it knows how to use up (burn) almost immediately. The energy that comes from carbohydrates might head directly into storage. This ends up as fat around the body and even on the organs of the trunk or midsection.

Considering the source of calories is a useful way to almost immediately reduce the chances for midsection fat storage. Cut your daily caloric intake of carbohydrates to around 40% or less of total calories.

Do BOTH cardio and strengthening. A lot of people make the mistake of thinking that a lot of cardio is the best way to blast belly fat, but the truth is that people with a higher volume of muscle will always burn calories as they exercise and for a much longer period of time afterward. So, when you want to really tap into any stored fat (whether visible or visceral) you will want to work on strengthening as well as cardio.

Go for fiber in the daily diet. Studies have shown that people who begin consuming around ten grams of soluble fiber each day (and without making any other changes in their diets) will become far less likely to develop belly fat. That translates to a large apple, a handful of cooked beans, or a full cup of peas.

Get more sleep and less stress. Though this has very little to do with diet and exercise, if you are not properly rested and living with too much stress, it will trigger the body to store fat. This is the type of fat that usually appears on organs and the midsection.

So, with just a few fairly simple facts, you can begin to make the changes needed to eliminate belly fat, and keep it off forever.

Source: Martin, Laura J., “How to Lose Belly Fat”, WebMD

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

What’s Better for Weight Loss: Diet or Exercise?

by Jari Love

When you set your sights on weight loss, the formula seems easy: work out more, eat less. But a new study in the International Journal of Epidemiology shows that it might be more about what you eat, putting truth to the idiom “abs are made in the kitchen, not the gym.”

In 2013, researchers from Loyola University began looking into the relative power of diet and exercise as they relate to moving the scale. They thought they’d discover that exercise would prove to be a crucial component for weight loss. Two years later, though, the science shows that the largest driver behind obesity is not how sedentary people are but instead how poor their diet is.

“Physical activity is crucially important for improving overall health and fitness levels, but there is limited evidence to suggest that it can blunt the surge in obesity,” the study authors explained. Why? The more you work out, the more your appetite increases.

Of course, this new Loyola study isn’t the first to come to this conclusion. Research has consistently shown for years now that exercise doesn’t necessarily lead to weight loss. In a meta-analysis published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics last year, for example, researchers found that people only lost noticeable weight if they combined exercise and calorie restriction.

This is the problem with most weight-loss advice, the Loyola researchers said, which often puts statements like “take the stairs instead of the elevator” or “walk 10,000 steps a day” on par with calorie restriction. Study authors Richard S. Cooper, M.D., and Amy Luke, Ph.D., said they’re not trying to drive people away from fitness, but rather expose problems with current health campaigns. Take this new one funded by Coca-Cola—it (falsely!) emphasizes exercise over a healthy diet.

But don’t you dare drop your gym membership! Being active has a ton of benefits that go far beyond what the scale says. Increasing your strength and endurance has been shown to help prevent cancer, improve mental health, help diabetes, and help you live longer. Plus, research shows that dieters who exercise are better able to maintain weight loss and are also able to lose fat while keeping valuable muscle. You just need to make sure you’re logging your gym time and your food intake.

via shape.com

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

Food Myths Revealed

by Jari Love

It goes like this: A client looking to lead a healthier life hires me, a nutritionist, to help him improve his diet. I analyze what he’s been eating, factor in his food preferences, and together we create an eating plan that fits his lifestyle and goals. Soon after, he’s noticeably leaner and more energetic—a happy customer.

 That’s when the trouble starts. After a coworker asks him for the details of his diet, my client suddenly finds himself in a heated interrogation. Doesn’t your nutritionist know red meat causes cancer? And that potatoes cause diabetes? Shouldn’t he tell you to eat less salt, to prevent high blood pressure?

 That’s because nutrition misinformation fools people into being confused and frustrated in their quest to eat healthily, even if they’re already achieving great results.

 Thankfully, you’re about to be enlightened by science. Here are 5 food myths you can forget about for good.

Myth #1: “High protein intake is harmful to your kidneys.”

The origin: Back in 1983, researchers first discovered that eating more protein increases your “glomerular filtration rate,” or GFR. Think of GFR as the amount of blood your kidneys are filtering per minute. From this finding, many scientists made the leap that a higher GFR places your kidneys under greater stress.

What science really shows: Nearly 2 decades ago, Dutch researchers found that while a protein-rich meal did boost GFR, it didn’t have an adverse effect on overall kidney function. In fact, there’s zero published research showing that downing hefty amounts of protein—specifically, up to 1.27 grams per pound of body weight a day—damages healthy kidneys.

The bottom line: As a rule of thumb, shoot to eat your target body weight in grams of protein daily. For example, if you’re a chubby 200 pounds and want to be a lean 180, then have 180 grams of protein a day. Likewise if you’re a skinny 150 pounds but want to be a muscular 180.

Myth #2: “Sweet potatoes are better for you than white potatoes.”

The origin: Because most Americans eat the highly processed version of the white potato—for instance, french fries and potato chips—consumption of this root vegetable has been linked to obesity and an increased diabetes risk.

Meanwhile, sweet potatoes, which are typically eaten whole, have been celebrated for being rich in nutrients and also having a lower glycemic index than their white brethren.

What science really shows: White potatoes and sweet potatoes have complementary nutritional differences; one isn’t necessarily better than the other. For instance, sweet potatoes have more fiber and vitamin A, but white potatoes are higher in essential minerals, such as iron, magnesium, and potassium.

As for the glycemic index, sweet potatoes are lower on the scale, but baked white potatoes typically aren’t eaten without cheese, sour cream, or butter. These toppings all contain fat, which lowers the glycemic index of a meal.

The bottom line: The form in which you consume a potato—for instance, a whole baked potato versus a processed potato that’s used to make chips—is more important than the type of spud.

Myth #3: “Red meat causes cancer.”

The origin: In a 1986 study, Japanese researchers discovered cancer developing in rats that were fed “heterocyclic amines,” compounds that are generated from overcooking meat under high heat. And since then, some studies of large populations have suggested a potential link between meat and cancer.

What science really shows: No study has ever found a direct cause-and-effect relationship between red-meat consumption and cancer. As for the population studies, they’re far from conclusive. That’s because they rely on broad surveys of people’s eating habits and health afflictions, and those numbers are simply crunched to find trends, not causes.

The bottom line: Don’t stop grilling. Meat lovers who are worried about the supposed risks of grilled meat don’t need to avoid burgers and steak; rather, they should just trim off the burned or overcooked sections of the meat before eating.

Myth #4: “High-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is more fattening than regular sugar is.”

The origin: In a 1968 study, rats that were fed large amounts of fructose developed high levels of fat in their bloodstreams.

Then, in 2002, University of California at Davis researchers published a well-publicized paper noting that Americans’ increasing consumption of fructose, including that in HFCS, paralleled our skyrocketing rates of obesity.

What science really shows: Both HFCS and sucrose—better known as table sugar—contain similar amounts of fructose. For instance, the two most commonly used types of HFCS are HFCS-42 and HFCS-55, which are 42 and 55% fructose, respectively.

Sucrose is almost chemically identical, containing 50% fructose. This is why the University of California at Davis scientists determined fructose intakes from both HFCS and sucrose.

The truth is, there’s no evidence to show any differences in these two types of sugar. Both will cause weight gain when consumed in excess.

The bottom line: HFCS and regular sugar are empty-calorie carbohydrates that should be consumed in limited amounts. How? By keeping soft drinks, sweetened fruit juices, and prepackaged desserts to a minimum.

Myth #5: “Salt causes high blood pressure and should be avoided.”

The origin: In the 1940s, a Duke University researcher named Walter Kempner, MD, became famous for using salt restriction to treat people with high blood pressure. Later, studies confirmed that reducing salt could help reduce hypertension.

What science really shows: Large-scale scientific reviews have determined there’s no reason for people with normal blood pressure to restrict their sodium intake.

Now, if you already have high blood pressure, you may be “salt sensitive.” As a result, reducing the amount of salt you eat could be helpful. However, it’s been known for the past 20 years that people with high blood pressure who don’t want to lower their salt intake can simply consume more potassium-containing foods. Why? Because it’s really the balance of the two minerals that matters.

In fact, Dutch researchers determined that a low potassium intake has the same impact on your blood pressure as high salt consumption does. And it turns out, the average guy consumes 3,100 milligrams (mg) of potassium a day—1,600 mg less than recommended.

The bottom line: Strive for a potassium-rich diet, which you can achieve by eating a wide variety of fruits, vegetables, and legumes. For instance, spinach, broccoli, bananas, white potatoes, and most types of beans each contain more than 400 mg potassium per serving.

via prevention.com

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

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Vegetarian Meatballs with Zucchini Noodles Recipe

by Jari Love

Do you love meatballs but are looking for a healthy or vegetarian alternative? These bite-size, meat-free meatballs will do just the trick without leaving your taste buds deprived.

Sautéed vegetables are combined with cooked quinoa, Italian breadcrumbs and flax “eggs” that act as a binder for these meatless meatballs. They’re perfect for those who eat a plant-based, vegan diet or for sneaking in some vegetables for picky eaters.

The whole family will enjoy this Italian dish gone veggie friendly. We enjoy serving ours over fresh spiralized zucchini noodles, but you can certainly use pasta if desired. Look for a spiralizer online or in most home goods stores.

Quinoa-veggie meatballs over zucchini noodles recipe

This vegan dish uses quinoa and vegetables that are formed into “meat”balls and then baked and served over zucchini noodles for an easy healthy dinner.

Serves: 6

Prep time: 25 minutes | Cook time: 45 minutes | Total time: 1 hour 10 minutes

Ingredients:

  • 3 tablespoons ground flaxseeds 
  • 1/4 cup hot water 
  • 1 small sweet onion, diced 
  • 1 cup sliced mushrooms 
  • 2 carrots, chopped 
  • 2 celery stalks 
  • 4 garlic cloves 
  • 1 teaspoon onion powder 
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil 
  • Salt and pepper, to taste 
  • 1 cup cooked quinoa 
  • 1/2 cup Italian-style breadcrumbs 
  • 1/2 tablespoon dried Italian herbs 
  • 1/4 cup nutritional yeast 
  • 1 (24 ounce) jar tomato pasta sauce 
  • 4 large zucchini 
  • Fresh chopped parsley, for garnish

Directions:

  1. In a bowl, combine the flaxseeds and hot water. Mix well, and let sit for 5 minutes. Using a spiralizer, prepare the zucchini noodles, transfer them to a large bowl, and set them aside until ready to use.
  2. Heat a large pan over medium-high heat. Add the vegetables, garlic and olive oil. Season with onion powder, salt and pepper, and cook the vegetables until tender, about 10 minutes.
  3. Heat the oven to 400 degrees F, and line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  4. To the bowl of a food processor, add the flax mixture, quinoa, breadcrumbs, herbs, nutritional yeast and roasted vegetables.
  5. Pulse the mixture several times to blend and chop until the desired consistency is reached. (If the mixture is too sticky to handle, add a few tablespoons of breadcrumbs.)
  6. Roll the mixture into balls, keeping them uniform in size. Bake the meatballs for 20 to 25 minutes or until firm.
  7. Once baked, add the meatballs to a saucepot, and cover with the jar of tomato sauce. Simmer until warm, about 8 to 10 minutes.
  8. Divide the zucchini noodles among bowls, and top with the meatballs and tomato sauce. Garnish with fresh parsley, and serve.

via sheknows.com

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

By Collage Video | | Healthy, Jari Love, Recipe, tips, Weekly Blog, Wellness | 0 comments | Read more

Heart Rate Training and Working Heart Rate Zones

by Jari Love

 Why is Heart Rate Training Effective?

Your heart is the most important muscle in your body. It is always functioning and maintaining itself. In most people, the heart operates at a fairly low level every day, but as with any muscle, regular exercise over time can increase its capacity to deal with more tasks with less strain.

Heart rate is an indicator of how hard you are working because it has a direct correlation with oxygen consumption (% VO2 max) when exercising. Monitoring your heart rate during exercise and training within specific heart rate zones will allow you to know more accurately what intensity you are working at, and allow you to exercise much more efficiently (less time!).

We know that as exercise intensity changes (through a combination of adjusting resistance and cadence) there is a linear increase in VO2R and heart rate. This is why monitoring heart rate is such an effective way to determine training intensity.  Heart rate monitors have made the ability for the average person to do this.

Determining Maximum Heart Rate
Heart rate training requires you to know your maximum heart rate (HRmax), which is the maximum number of times the heart can beat in one minute. The physiological testing that is required to obtain a true measure of HRmax is expensive and requires an individual to perform exercise at a maximal effort – not everybody wants to do this.

Fortunately, there’s an alternate way to determine HRmax through maximum heart rate prediction formulas, which are based on regression equations. It’s important to note that there are multiple formulas available to determine your HRmax and few researchers and exercise physiologists can agree on the best one.  Although using a standard formula will results in a degree of error due to genetic and gender differences, it is still a great way to get an approximation of where your heart rate should be for each of the heart rate training zones.

When it comes to group exercise, the most common and widely used Age Predicted HRmax Formula is:  HRmax = 220 – your age

Example:  An individual who is 43 years old would have an age predicted HRmax of 177bpm.  Answer: 220 – 43 = 177bpm

Checking Your Heart Rate as You Train

An excellent way to monitor exercise intensity is to take your pulse periodically by pressing lightly on your radial artery (the thumb side of your wrist, between the tendon and the bone). Use your index and middle fingers to exert pressure just light enough to feel the artery throb as your heart beats. Count the number of times your heart beats over 10 seconds and multiply by 6 to get your heart rate.

For a more accurate measurement, consider getting a heart rate monitor. These days, you will find that heart rate monitors are relatively inexpensive and are easy to use. In addition to its greater precision in measuring your heart rate, it can also act as a motivational tool during your workout sessions.

Heart rate monitors consist of a transmitter that fits around your chest area and a wireless receiver that is worn like a regular wristwatch. Using a heart rate monitor is an effective way to stay within specific heart rate zones during workouts. Instead of relying on guesswork, you will know exactly how you are performing and if you need to slow down or step things up.

 Heart Rate Training Zones

There are five heart rate zones that go from least to most intense. Each target heart zone is expressed as a certain percentage of your maximum heart rate.  Exercising within your target heart rate is a great way to make sure that you are not under-training or overtraining, and serves as one of the best guidelines for achieving personal fitness goals. Heart Rate Zone training will get you on the fast track to fitness success.

Determining Heart Rate Training Zones

In order to take advantage of exercising within heart zones, you will need to determine the heart rates that correspond to the different training intensities. Using the chart below as a guide, calculate your heart rate training zones using your HRmax.

% of Your Max HR

Formula

Your HR

50% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax_______ bpm x 0.50 =

60% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax _______ bmp x 0.60 =

70% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax_______ bmp x 0.70 =

80% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax_______ bpm x 0.80 =

90% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax_______ bpm x 0.90 =

Next, you will simply join the percentages together in order to determine your heart rate training zones.  Copy the chart below into a notebook that you can keep with you while you are training.

Zone 1

(50 – 60%)

Zone 2

(60 – 70%)

Zone 3

(70 – 80%)

Zone 4

(80 – 90%)

Zone 5

(90 – 100%)

 Example:  An individual who is 43 years old would have an age predicted HRmax of 177bpm (220 – 43 = 177bpm).  Their charts would look like this:

% of Your Max HR

Formula

HR

50% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax 177 bpm x 0.50 =

88.5 bpm

60% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax 177 bpm x 0.60 =

106.2 bpm

70% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax 177 bpm x 0.70 =

123.9 bpm

80% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax 177 bpm x 0.80 =

141.6 bpm

90% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax 177 bpm x 0.90 =

159.3 bpm

 

Zone 1

(50 – 60%)

Zone 2

(60 – 70%)

Zone 3

(70 – 80%)

Zone 4

(80 – 90%)

Zone 5

(90 – 100%)

88.5 – 106.2 bpm

106.2 – 123.9 bpm

123.9 – 141.6 bpm

141.6 – 159.3 bpm

159.3 – 177 bpm

 Zone 1 – Healthy Heart Zone – Getting Fit!

  • In this zone, you stay at 50% to 60% of your maximum heart rate; this is gentle exertion
  • When working in Zone 1, your Rate of Perceived of Exertion (RPE) on a scale of 1-10 (10 being maximal effort) should be approximately 2-3 out of 10.
  • Fuels burned in Zone 1:  10% carbohydrates, 60-85% fat and 5% protein.
  • This is not a hot calorie-burning pace: you only burn ± 5 calories per minute.
  •  In this zone you’re at 55-65% maximum aerobic capacity (VO² Max, a body’s maximum capacity to carry and use oxygen during exercise).

Five things to know about Zone 1:

  • Even at this comfortable pace, the health payoff is huge: a Zone 1 workout lowers blood pressure, builds muscle mass, reduces body fat, improves our immune system and cholesterol levels, and lowers your heart attack risk.
  • Most of the calories burned in this zone, even though you won’t burn a huge number, are fat calories. That’s a good thing.
  • This is a safe zone, so it’s ideal for inactive people trying to become more active.
  • To get the benefits of working in Zone 1, you must spend at least 10 minutes in the zone every day.
  • You will feel fatigue after a time in Zone 1 because your energy and fluids are being depleted. Drink water!

Zone 2 – Temperate Zone – Staying Fit!

  • In this zone, you work at 60-70% of your maximum heart rate.
  • When working in Zone 2, your RPE on a scale of 1-10 (10 being maximal effort) should be approximately 3-5 out of 10.
  • Fuels burned in Zone 2:  10% carbohydrates, 50-80% fat and 5% protein.
  • You burn ±10 calories in Zone 2 – twice as many as in Zone 1.
  • In Zone 2 you’re at 66-75% VO² Max.

Five things to know about Zone 2:

  • This is the level at which most people exercise every day – a moderate and comfortable zone.
  • You’re still burning mostly fat calories in Zone 2 – more than in Zone 1 – and building muscle mass at the same time.
  • With more muscle mass, you burn more calories even when you’re inactive.
  • The more you train in Zone 2, the more efficient your body gets at using fat for energy, because your fat-burning enzymes are more active overall.
  • When you develop more stamina, you’ll be able to use Zone 2 as a recovery zone or a long, slow endurance zone.

Zone 3 – Aerobic Zone – Getting Fitter!

  • In Zone 3, you’re working at 70-80% of your maximum heart rate.
  • When working in Zone 3, your RPE on a scale of 1-10 (10 being maximal effort) should be approximately 5-7 out of 10.
  • Fuels burned in Zone 3:  60% carbohydrates, 35% fat and 5% protein.
  • Your calorie burn in Zone 3 increases slightly to ±13 per minute.
  • In Zone 3 you are at 76-80% VO² Max.

Five things to know about Zone 3:

  • This zone is the “sweet spot” of training; it’s where you get the most benefits in the least amount of time.
  • You’re in good company here; this is the zone where high-performance athletes will spend most of their time.
  • In Zone 3 the emphasis of calories being burned shifts from fat calories to carbohydrates.
  • Two major benefits of working in Zone 3: here your body builds resistance to fatigue, and you improve your VO² Max.
  • The body can only hold so many carbohydrates needed for energy, so it’s important to make sure you are getting adequate nutrition before long periods of Zone 3 training, or any work in Zones 4 or 5.

Zone 4 – Threshold Zone – Getting Even More Fit!

  • In Zone 4, you’re working at 80-90% of your maximum heart rate.
  • When working in Zone 4, your RPE on a scale of 1-10 (10 being maximal effort) should be approximately 7-9 out of 10.
  • Fuels burned in Zone 4:  80% carbohydrates, 15% fat and 5% protein.
  • The calorie burn increases only slightly again in Zone 4, to ±15 per minute.
  • In Zone 4 you are at 81-90% VO² Max.

Five things to know about Zone 4:

  • Benefits of working in Zone 4 include increased aerobic and anaerobic energy pathways, a higher anaerobic threshold, a better oxygen transport system and higher lactic acid clearance.
  • For most fit athletes, Zone 4 is an anaerobic threshold – the point at which oxygen is consumed more than it’s delivered. Also, your body produces lactic acid faster than it can be metabolized in this zone.
  • Training at or just below the anaerobic threshold allows your body to buffer, recycle and clear waste from lactic acid production. For that reason, endurance athletes work to get their anaerobic threshold as high as possible.
  • Your body transports oxygen better in Zone 4.
  • This is the maximum sustainable heart rate; staying at this threshold for too long may cause your arms and legs to feel rubbery and your breathing to become shallow and erratic.  Make sure you know your limits!

Zone 5 – Red Line Zone – Getting Fittest!

  • In Zone 5, you’re working at 90-100% of your maximum heart rate.
  • When working in Zone 5, your RPE on a scale of 1-10 (10 being maximal effort) should be approximately 9-10 out of 10.
  • Fuels burned in Zone 5: 90% carbohydrates, 5% fat and 5% protein.
  • Calories burn at a rate of ±20 per minute in Zone 5.
  • In Zone 5 you are at 91-100% VO² Max.

Five things to know about Zone 5:

  • Benefits of working in Zone 5 include increased anaerobic energy sources, better speed and improved neuromuscular coordination.
  •  Zone 5 workouts are very difficult but they sharpen muscle efficiency and coordination.
  • If you’re running a race, you would use Zone 5 to break away from the pack early, or to finish a long run with a sprint.
  •  You cannot work in Zone 5 for sustained periods without slowing for a breather; you will fatigue quickly.
  • Too much time spent training in a Zone 5 may increase your risk of injury and becoming over-trained.  When it comes to Zone 5, think quality over quantity!

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

By Collage Video | | Abs, exercise, fitness, Healthy, Jari Love, practice, tips, Weekly Blog, Wellness | 0 comments | Read more

Things You Should Do Before Every Workout

by Jari Love

You should never dive into a workout cold. Taking the extra time to prep your body before training will help you get the most out of the time invested. “If you don’t warm up, you run the risk of doing too much too fast,” says Joseph Mosher, strength conditioning coach at New York University Athletics. “You may not have the mobility to do the exercise, the joint strength to take the load you apply to it, or the timing of the nervous system to use the muscles in the correct order. These can all lead to poor mechanics, which typically leads to injury at some point.” So whether it’s chest day, leg day, or a long run, follow these steps to make the most of it.

Eat and Drink Right: Watch what you eat to avoid an energy crash. “Foods to avoid would be anything that is high in fat content, oils, processed foods, or anything that bothers your stomach,” he says. Avoid carbonated sodas, doughnuts, and hamburgers. The overarching rule: take something that you know won’t cause gastrointestinal distress, like bloating, heartburn, constipation, and indigestion.

Mosher recommends fresh fruit as a good option. He also notes that a cup of coffee isn’t a terrible idea before a workout since caffeine has also been shown to help with training sessions for a myriad of reasons: it helps to stall fatigue, stimulate the nervous system, and possibly speed recovery.

Get Hydrated: “Dehydration is not good for you,” says Mosher. “It decreases blood volume, decreases elasticity of connective tissue, and increases the risk of cramping. You should have some sort of water with you at all times.” Mosher recommends drinking your body weight in ounces of water a day as a good place to start when it comes to figuring out how much you should consume on a regular basis. “If you exercise a lot, then that number will go up, but it’s a great starting point.”

Always Warm Up: According to Mosher, warmup exercises are important for three reasons: They increase blood flow to the muscles (delivering the nutrients and oxygen needed for a workout), boost nerve conduction to the muscles (helping with your speed and coordination), and stimulate synovial fluid — the liquid that lubricates and protects your joints from wear and tear.

And the first step to a warmup is getting in the zone. “[Don’t] stop your warmup to check your phone for texts, status updates, or funny videos,” Mosher says. “Starting and stopping will not only set you up for failure because of the lack of concentration, but also extend a warmup beyond what is needed.” At the very least, never skip your warmup. “If you don’t have time to warmup, you don’t have time to train.”

Mobility Drills: The second part of your warmup should include mobility drills. “[These] allow you to keep moving and continue the process of preparing your body for the workout,” says Mosher. If you’re sitting for most of the day, opening up your hips and shoulders is extremely important. So while your body might have adapted to a sitting position during the workday — with rolled, forward shoulders and shortened hip flexors — waking up certain areas can get you back to a “more natural, neutral state” for your workout.

Here’s Mosher’s technique: on an upper-body day, try wall slides and/or over-the-head shoulder reaches. On a lower-body day, dive into 1/2 kneeling quad mobility and/or Spidermans.

Foam Roll: All warmups should involve a foam roller. Mosher describes the exercise as a “great way to start basic movement and increase body temperature.” It helps your body decrease tension in the muscles and loosen up any of the tight muscles/fascia that will be trained that day — as well as any tender points. “Upper-body days, I would focus on the lats, pecs, and posterior shoulders the most,” Mosher says. “Lower-body days, I would focus on the glutes, groin, hip flexors, and calves.”

And if rolling out your joints seems tedious or simple, Mosher says that’s a mistaken mindset when it comes to health. “Sometimes foam-rolling and mobility drills get boring, but skipping them too often can lead you down the path to injury because you did not prepare correctly,” he says.

Stability Drills: For the final phase of your warmup, jump into stability drills to create a great amount of stiffness in your midsection, which will help you to lift more, says Mosher. Because the body starts with stability in its center, if you don’t have a stable middle, your strength and energy will have to come from elsewhere — and that often decreases your mobility, weakening your workout and form (“The doom loop of injury,” Mosher says).

He lists some solid stability drills, including RKC (Russian Kettlebell) plank, which means total contraction of the body in a plank position 10 to 15 seconds at a time, Dead Bugs or Bird Dogs. “These drills are great because they help you learn to move around a solid midsection, while still breathing naturally,” Mosher says.

Go Through the Motions: Before going hard, you should try out the equipment you plan to use for the day. “You can always start with body-weight exercises first, like push-ups for bench day or body-weight squats for squat day.” And once you finish body-weight drills, you can progress to an empty bar, and then add weights incrementally as you need them. “There should always be two to three warmup sets before you start your working load for the day,” Mosher says. “This is the time to really focus on hammering good form, making sure you are moving as fluidly and perfectly as possible.” Once these sets are done, you’re ready to roll.

via popsugar.com

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

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Bust a Gut on the Treadmill

by Jari Love

You know that time spent on the treadmill gives you a great cardio workout, but did you know that it can actually be even more effective than pumping iron for getting rid of belly fat? That’s great news for people who hate weight training but don’t mind hopping on the treadmill a few times a week.

 Belly fat isn’t quite like arm flab or butt sag. It’s far more dangerous, because it’s actually packed around your body’s internal organs. It’s linked to various types of cancer, as well as cardiovascular problems and type 2 diabetes, and it’s believed to contribute to premature death.

 According to Time Magazine, a new study conducted by Duke University researchers monitored 196 overweight, sedentary adults ranging in age from 18-70. They divided them randomly into a group that did three sets of weight training (8-12 reps for 3 days a week), another that jogged 12 miles each week at a heart rate of 80%, and another that did both weight training and aerobics. At the end of 8 months the aerobic/weight training group lost noticeable amounts of belly fat. The group that did aerobic training alone had the same results! What about the benefit to the weight training group? There was no significant benefit.

 Clearly, the humble treadmill is one of the best ways you can exercise to lose that dangerous belly fat. And not only will it help you reduce your waistline, it’s great for your overall health as well. Regular aerobic exercise helps you lose weight, and the cardio benefits help lower your risk of heart attacks and strokes.

 For the most effective treadmill workout, switch it up from time to time. Interval training, which consists of short, intense periods of running or jogging on an incline followed by a slower pace, helps you ratchet up your calorie burn rate so you melt off the fat quickly. As long as your body feels challenged, you’re getting it right.

 To maximize the benefits of your treadmill workout, you should also follow a healthy diet, rich in fruits, vegetables, and lean protein. Remember to drink lots of water – it helps you stay properly hydrated and aids in flushing toxins from your body. Don’t try to lose weight too quickly. Usually two pounds per week is a safe goal, and you can reach it just by doing thirty minutes on the treadmill each day!

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

By Collage Video | | exercise, Jari Love, tips, Weekly Blog, Wellness | 0 comments | Read more

HIIT

by Jari Love

Lately we have talked a lot about HIIT, mainly because it is so popular right now in the fitness industry. Read this article to understand if HIIT is the be-all-end-all to workouts or if you should use variety in your workouts to get maximum fat loss results. If you love HIIT workouts because they save you time, I’ve included my favourite 30 minute HIIT workout for you! But with all HIIT workouts, you should ease into it, and always warm up. If you’re a beginner, try one of my early on workouts like the Get RIPPED DVD to ease into it. This article does have some interesting points to make on HIIT.

 If you’re at all interested in fitness, then chances are you’ve heard of high-intensity interval training, otherwise referred to as HIIT. Perhaps you’ve read about it online, seen it discussed in your favorite fitness magazine, or simply heard others talking about it at your local gym. Whatever the case may be, there’s a good chance what you heard sounded something like, “HIIT is the only way to burn fat” or “If you aren’t doing HIIT, you’re wasting your time in the gym.” Or maybe it said, “Steady-state cardio doesn’t burn fat — HIIT does, and there’s no other way to train.”

 We are being bombarded with statements like these, and they’ve led everyone to jump on the HIIT bandwagon. If you’re going to the gym, you’re doing HIIT. It’s that simple. But, is HIIT right for you?

 It’s important to question what you read and hear about HIIT, because most of these sources don’t have your best interests in mind. Is HIIT really worth the hype? Let’s look at a few factors that may make you think otherwise.

Let’s get one thing straight. HIIT is the most intense form of exercise you can do. This is what brings forth the benefits it has to offer. For some people, this is great. Intensity is the name of their game and they are fully prepared to go that extra mile and put in that level of work.

 For others, it’s a recipe for disaster. Take your average gym-goer as an example. They’ve just started their workout routine. They likely went to the gym because they have 20 pounds to lose — or more — and are ready to finally do something about it. Prior to joining, their activity level consisted of little more than getting up to look for food in the fridge or going for a walk here and there, but only when they found a burst of motivation.

 These are usually the type of people who love instant gratification. After all, instant gratification is what got them in this position in the first place. The cake was tastier than the apple, and therefore it’s what they ate. Now, they have this excess weight and are looking to get it off pronto. They aren’t looking to take the long journey to weight loss. So, when they hear that HIIT is the fastest way to burn fat, they jump onboard.

 

The issue with this is they aren’t actually ready to jump onboard. They’re out of shape and need a slow and steady approach, not one that calls for 110 percent of their effort at a near-maximal pace. Unaware of this fact, many attempt HIIT anyway — and then one of three things happens:

 They become injured — HIIT will put you at a higher risk of injury if it’s not done properly.

   Or, they try it, hit those intensity levels, and hate it so much they leave the gym forever.

 For these reasons, a person who wishes to lose weight shouldn’t go down the HIIT route. Instead, they should get started on the exact type of exercise they’re apprehensive about: steady-state cardio training. This type of exercise will help them build up their fitness levels to the point that they feel comfortable moving on to HIIT sessions successfully.

 Another often unaddressed issue with HIIT is that it’s very taxing on the central nervous system.  Any form of high-intensity exercise, whether it’s HIIT cardio training or weight lifting activities, is going to wear you down.

 The problem with this is HIIT is often emphasized as being the only way to burn fat, so people who are highly motivated attempt three to four sessions per week. Then, they pair that with three to four sessions of intense weightlifting per week. While they might sustain this regimen for a few weeks, their body will eventually grow tired. Some people will even see this fatigue as a sign they aren’t training hard enough and begin upping the intensity even more.

 HIIT can be good if you are at a fitness level where it’s possible, and even then, it should be performed in moderation. A balance between rest, recovery, and intense training will lead to optimal results, but many people aren’t able to do this successfully.

 Finally, you might want to forgo HIIT training if you’re on a low-carb diet. When it comes to weight loss, diet will always trump exercise in terms of the results that can be seen. It’s just far easier to cut calories than it is to burn them off in the gym.

 Therefore, diet should be priority number one. But if you happen to be on a reduced-carb diet — one that’s been proven effective in burning fat — you might not have the necessary fuel to complete HIIT.

 HIIT is an anaerobic form of exercise, meaning that the body needs fuel in the form of glucose to get through it. If you are taking in a limited amount of carbohydrates, there simply won’t be enough glucose to fuel your workout, especially if you’re doing strength training too.

 This will cause your performance to falter and you won’t hit the intensity levels you’re aiming for, even if you have the best intentions. When this happens, you have two options: you can either add more carbs to your diet plan or replace HIIT with a lower intensity form of aerobic cardio that uses fat as a fuel source. For many people, the likelier option to choose is the second one. It’ll keep their low-carb diet intact and they’ll only have to adjust their exercise plan.

 There’s no denying that HIIT can be highly beneficial when performed under the right circumstances. Unfortunately, it simply isn’t ideal for everyone. Don’t fall for the hype that HIIT is the only right way to train. That just isn’t the case.

 Try this workout for a 30 minute HIIT workout:

 1 minute of each exercise and repeat the whole thing 3 times. Start with a 3 minute warmup and end with 3 minutes of stretching. I’ve got higher intense moves in brackets for those more advanced.

    Squats (jump squats)

    High knee runs

    Push-ups (on toes and go all the way down to till your chest hits the ground)

    Skater jumps

    Alternating lunges (jump lunges)

    Jumping jacks

    Bicycle Abs

    Mountain climbers

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

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At Home Workouts

by Jari Love

At home workouts are taking over

Don’t have the income necessary for a gym membership? Not interested in being around a lot of toned and experienced fitness buffs? Maybe you just don’t like the idea of heading into a club or center to get exercise? No worries because there are many ways that you can start enjoying at home workouts that can give you the same tone, definition, or results that you thought available only at a gym.

 Equipment – You don’t need to sink a lot of money into equipment for fitness and exercise. While you could go online and use auction sites or local resources to find used gym gear, you can also find a lot of alternative solutions and affordable options. For example, a lot of people create their own “kettlebell” weights using a one gallon milk jug. They fill it to the level they want in order to get various weights. A lot of people also find that investing in a good set of fitness bands or resistance bands is far more flexible than a set of weights. For instance, one woman would use her fitness bands each time she went to the playground with her kids. She did assisted pull ups and lifts with them and spent only a small amount to get very durable gear.

 Space – Whether you are going to do a lot of strength training or cardio “at home” you probably don’t need to convert an entire room into a gym. You can just measure out a safe area that allows you to perform moves such as burpees, jumping rope, and lunges. When you have enough room to swing your arms and extend your body, you also have enough room to sprint in place, and do all of the floor work required. You can even purchase gym mats that will help to reduce noise or prevent slipping.

 Routines – This is where a lot of people “feel” the difference between a gym and an at home workout. However, with the Internet, streaming media, and an enormous number of articles and resources, you can begin to develop routines that are safe and effective. You won’t miss the gym experience at all and you can often find information for free or at very affordable prices – including DVD sets for special routines.

 You can easily do at home workouts of any kind. You don’t have to commit a lot of money to the process, and yet you too can start to have a toned and strong body in a very short time.

 Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

By Collage Video | | exercise, Jari Love, tips, Weekly Blog, Wellness | 0 comments | Read more
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