Love Notes by Jari Love

Heart Rate Training and Working Heart Rate Zones

by Jari Love

 Why is Heart Rate Training Effective?

Your heart is the most important muscle in your body. It is always functioning and maintaining itself. In most people, the heart operates at a fairly low level every day, but as with any muscle, regular exercise over time can increase its capacity to deal with more tasks with less strain.

Heart rate is an indicator of how hard you are working because it has a direct correlation with oxygen consumption (% VO2 max) when exercising. Monitoring your heart rate during exercise and training within specific heart rate zones will allow you to know more accurately what intensity you are working at, and allow you to exercise much more efficiently (less time!).

We know that as exercise intensity changes (through a combination of adjusting resistance and cadence) there is a linear increase in VO2R and heart rate. This is why monitoring heart rate is such an effective way to determine training intensity.  Heart rate monitors have made the ability for the average person to do this.

Determining Maximum Heart Rate
Heart rate training requires you to know your maximum heart rate (HRmax), which is the maximum number of times the heart can beat in one minute. The physiological testing that is required to obtain a true measure of HRmax is expensive and requires an individual to perform exercise at a maximal effort – not everybody wants to do this.

Fortunately, there’s an alternate way to determine HRmax through maximum heart rate prediction formulas, which are based on regression equations. It’s important to note that there are multiple formulas available to determine your HRmax and few researchers and exercise physiologists can agree on the best one.  Although using a standard formula will results in a degree of error due to genetic and gender differences, it is still a great way to get an approximation of where your heart rate should be for each of the heart rate training zones.

When it comes to group exercise, the most common and widely used Age Predicted HRmax Formula is:  HRmax = 220 – your age

Example:  An individual who is 43 years old would have an age predicted HRmax of 177bpm.  Answer: 220 – 43 = 177bpm

Checking Your Heart Rate as You Train

An excellent way to monitor exercise intensity is to take your pulse periodically by pressing lightly on your radial artery (the thumb side of your wrist, between the tendon and the bone). Use your index and middle fingers to exert pressure just light enough to feel the artery throb as your heart beats. Count the number of times your heart beats over 10 seconds and multiply by 6 to get your heart rate.

For a more accurate measurement, consider getting a heart rate monitor. These days, you will find that heart rate monitors are relatively inexpensive and are easy to use. In addition to its greater precision in measuring your heart rate, it can also act as a motivational tool during your workout sessions.

Heart rate monitors consist of a transmitter that fits around your chest area and a wireless receiver that is worn like a regular wristwatch. Using a heart rate monitor is an effective way to stay within specific heart rate zones during workouts. Instead of relying on guesswork, you will know exactly how you are performing and if you need to slow down or step things up.

 Heart Rate Training Zones

There are five heart rate zones that go from least to most intense. Each target heart zone is expressed as a certain percentage of your maximum heart rate.  Exercising within your target heart rate is a great way to make sure that you are not under-training or overtraining, and serves as one of the best guidelines for achieving personal fitness goals. Heart Rate Zone training will get you on the fast track to fitness success.

Determining Heart Rate Training Zones

In order to take advantage of exercising within heart zones, you will need to determine the heart rates that correspond to the different training intensities. Using the chart below as a guide, calculate your heart rate training zones using your HRmax.

% of Your Max HR

Formula

Your HR

50% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax_______ bpm x 0.50 =

60% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax _______ bmp x 0.60 =

70% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax_______ bmp x 0.70 =

80% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax_______ bpm x 0.80 =

90% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax_______ bpm x 0.90 =

Next, you will simply join the percentages together in order to determine your heart rate training zones.  Copy the chart below into a notebook that you can keep with you while you are training.

Zone 1

(50 – 60%)

Zone 2

(60 – 70%)

Zone 3

(70 – 80%)

Zone 4

(80 – 90%)

Zone 5

(90 – 100%)

 Example:  An individual who is 43 years old would have an age predicted HRmax of 177bpm (220 – 43 = 177bpm).  Their charts would look like this:

% of Your Max HR

Formula

HR

50% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax 177 bpm x 0.50 =

88.5 bpm

60% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax 177 bpm x 0.60 =

106.2 bpm

70% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax 177 bpm x 0.70 =

123.9 bpm

80% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax 177 bpm x 0.80 =

141.6 bpm

90% of your Max Heart Rate  =

HRmax 177 bpm x 0.90 =

159.3 bpm

 

Zone 1

(50 – 60%)

Zone 2

(60 – 70%)

Zone 3

(70 – 80%)

Zone 4

(80 – 90%)

Zone 5

(90 – 100%)

88.5 – 106.2 bpm

106.2 – 123.9 bpm

123.9 – 141.6 bpm

141.6 – 159.3 bpm

159.3 – 177 bpm

 Zone 1 – Healthy Heart Zone – Getting Fit!

  • In this zone, you stay at 50% to 60% of your maximum heart rate; this is gentle exertion
  • When working in Zone 1, your Rate of Perceived of Exertion (RPE) on a scale of 1-10 (10 being maximal effort) should be approximately 2-3 out of 10.
  • Fuels burned in Zone 1:  10% carbohydrates, 60-85% fat and 5% protein.
  • This is not a hot calorie-burning pace: you only burn ± 5 calories per minute.
  •  In this zone you’re at 55-65% maximum aerobic capacity (VO² Max, a body’s maximum capacity to carry and use oxygen during exercise).

Five things to know about Zone 1:

  • Even at this comfortable pace, the health payoff is huge: a Zone 1 workout lowers blood pressure, builds muscle mass, reduces body fat, improves our immune system and cholesterol levels, and lowers your heart attack risk.
  • Most of the calories burned in this zone, even though you won’t burn a huge number, are fat calories. That’s a good thing.
  • This is a safe zone, so it’s ideal for inactive people trying to become more active.
  • To get the benefits of working in Zone 1, you must spend at least 10 minutes in the zone every day.
  • You will feel fatigue after a time in Zone 1 because your energy and fluids are being depleted. Drink water!

Zone 2 – Temperate Zone – Staying Fit!

  • In this zone, you work at 60-70% of your maximum heart rate.
  • When working in Zone 2, your RPE on a scale of 1-10 (10 being maximal effort) should be approximately 3-5 out of 10.
  • Fuels burned in Zone 2:  10% carbohydrates, 50-80% fat and 5% protein.
  • You burn ±10 calories in Zone 2 – twice as many as in Zone 1.
  • In Zone 2 you’re at 66-75% VO² Max.

Five things to know about Zone 2:

  • This is the level at which most people exercise every day – a moderate and comfortable zone.
  • You’re still burning mostly fat calories in Zone 2 – more than in Zone 1 – and building muscle mass at the same time.
  • With more muscle mass, you burn more calories even when you’re inactive.
  • The more you train in Zone 2, the more efficient your body gets at using fat for energy, because your fat-burning enzymes are more active overall.
  • When you develop more stamina, you’ll be able to use Zone 2 as a recovery zone or a long, slow endurance zone.

Zone 3 – Aerobic Zone – Getting Fitter!

  • In Zone 3, you’re working at 70-80% of your maximum heart rate.
  • When working in Zone 3, your RPE on a scale of 1-10 (10 being maximal effort) should be approximately 5-7 out of 10.
  • Fuels burned in Zone 3:  60% carbohydrates, 35% fat and 5% protein.
  • Your calorie burn in Zone 3 increases slightly to ±13 per minute.
  • In Zone 3 you are at 76-80% VO² Max.

Five things to know about Zone 3:

  • This zone is the “sweet spot” of training; it’s where you get the most benefits in the least amount of time.
  • You’re in good company here; this is the zone where high-performance athletes will spend most of their time.
  • In Zone 3 the emphasis of calories being burned shifts from fat calories to carbohydrates.
  • Two major benefits of working in Zone 3: here your body builds resistance to fatigue, and you improve your VO² Max.
  • The body can only hold so many carbohydrates needed for energy, so it’s important to make sure you are getting adequate nutrition before long periods of Zone 3 training, or any work in Zones 4 or 5.

Zone 4 – Threshold Zone – Getting Even More Fit!

  • In Zone 4, you’re working at 80-90% of your maximum heart rate.
  • When working in Zone 4, your RPE on a scale of 1-10 (10 being maximal effort) should be approximately 7-9 out of 10.
  • Fuels burned in Zone 4:  80% carbohydrates, 15% fat and 5% protein.
  • The calorie burn increases only slightly again in Zone 4, to ±15 per minute.
  • In Zone 4 you are at 81-90% VO² Max.

Five things to know about Zone 4:

  • Benefits of working in Zone 4 include increased aerobic and anaerobic energy pathways, a higher anaerobic threshold, a better oxygen transport system and higher lactic acid clearance.
  • For most fit athletes, Zone 4 is an anaerobic threshold – the point at which oxygen is consumed more than it’s delivered. Also, your body produces lactic acid faster than it can be metabolized in this zone.
  • Training at or just below the anaerobic threshold allows your body to buffer, recycle and clear waste from lactic acid production. For that reason, endurance athletes work to get their anaerobic threshold as high as possible.
  • Your body transports oxygen better in Zone 4.
  • This is the maximum sustainable heart rate; staying at this threshold for too long may cause your arms and legs to feel rubbery and your breathing to become shallow and erratic.  Make sure you know your limits!

Zone 5 – Red Line Zone – Getting Fittest!

  • In Zone 5, you’re working at 90-100% of your maximum heart rate.
  • When working in Zone 5, your RPE on a scale of 1-10 (10 being maximal effort) should be approximately 9-10 out of 10.
  • Fuels burned in Zone 5: 90% carbohydrates, 5% fat and 5% protein.
  • Calories burn at a rate of ±20 per minute in Zone 5.
  • In Zone 5 you are at 91-100% VO² Max.

Five things to know about Zone 5:

  • Benefits of working in Zone 5 include increased anaerobic energy sources, better speed and improved neuromuscular coordination.
  •  Zone 5 workouts are very difficult but they sharpen muscle efficiency and coordination.
  • If you’re running a race, you would use Zone 5 to break away from the pack early, or to finish a long run with a sprint.
  •  You cannot work in Zone 5 for sustained periods without slowing for a breather; you will fatigue quickly.
  • Too much time spent training in a Zone 5 may increase your risk of injury and becoming over-trained.  When it comes to Zone 5, think quality over quantity!

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

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Things You Should Do Before Every Workout

by Jari Love

You should never dive into a workout cold. Taking the extra time to prep your body before training will help you get the most out of the time invested. “If you don’t warm up, you run the risk of doing too much too fast,” says Joseph Mosher, strength conditioning coach at New York University Athletics. “You may not have the mobility to do the exercise, the joint strength to take the load you apply to it, or the timing of the nervous system to use the muscles in the correct order. These can all lead to poor mechanics, which typically leads to injury at some point.” So whether it’s chest day, leg day, or a long run, follow these steps to make the most of it.

Eat and Drink Right: Watch what you eat to avoid an energy crash. “Foods to avoid would be anything that is high in fat content, oils, processed foods, or anything that bothers your stomach,” he says. Avoid carbonated sodas, doughnuts, and hamburgers. The overarching rule: take something that you know won’t cause gastrointestinal distress, like bloating, heartburn, constipation, and indigestion.

Mosher recommends fresh fruit as a good option. He also notes that a cup of coffee isn’t a terrible idea before a workout since caffeine has also been shown to help with training sessions for a myriad of reasons: it helps to stall fatigue, stimulate the nervous system, and possibly speed recovery.

Get Hydrated: “Dehydration is not good for you,” says Mosher. “It decreases blood volume, decreases elasticity of connective tissue, and increases the risk of cramping. You should have some sort of water with you at all times.” Mosher recommends drinking your body weight in ounces of water a day as a good place to start when it comes to figuring out how much you should consume on a regular basis. “If you exercise a lot, then that number will go up, but it’s a great starting point.”

Always Warm Up: According to Mosher, warmup exercises are important for three reasons: They increase blood flow to the muscles (delivering the nutrients and oxygen needed for a workout), boost nerve conduction to the muscles (helping with your speed and coordination), and stimulate synovial fluid — the liquid that lubricates and protects your joints from wear and tear.

And the first step to a warmup is getting in the zone. “[Don’t] stop your warmup to check your phone for texts, status updates, or funny videos,” Mosher says. “Starting and stopping will not only set you up for failure because of the lack of concentration, but also extend a warmup beyond what is needed.” At the very least, never skip your warmup. “If you don’t have time to warmup, you don’t have time to train.”

Mobility Drills: The second part of your warmup should include mobility drills. “[These] allow you to keep moving and continue the process of preparing your body for the workout,” says Mosher. If you’re sitting for most of the day, opening up your hips and shoulders is extremely important. So while your body might have adapted to a sitting position during the workday — with rolled, forward shoulders and shortened hip flexors — waking up certain areas can get you back to a “more natural, neutral state” for your workout.

Here’s Mosher’s technique: on an upper-body day, try wall slides and/or over-the-head shoulder reaches. On a lower-body day, dive into 1/2 kneeling quad mobility and/or Spidermans.

Foam Roll: All warmups should involve a foam roller. Mosher describes the exercise as a “great way to start basic movement and increase body temperature.” It helps your body decrease tension in the muscles and loosen up any of the tight muscles/fascia that will be trained that day — as well as any tender points. “Upper-body days, I would focus on the lats, pecs, and posterior shoulders the most,” Mosher says. “Lower-body days, I would focus on the glutes, groin, hip flexors, and calves.”

And if rolling out your joints seems tedious or simple, Mosher says that’s a mistaken mindset when it comes to health. “Sometimes foam-rolling and mobility drills get boring, but skipping them too often can lead you down the path to injury because you did not prepare correctly,” he says.

Stability Drills: For the final phase of your warmup, jump into stability drills to create a great amount of stiffness in your midsection, which will help you to lift more, says Mosher. Because the body starts with stability in its center, if you don’t have a stable middle, your strength and energy will have to come from elsewhere — and that often decreases your mobility, weakening your workout and form (“The doom loop of injury,” Mosher says).

He lists some solid stability drills, including RKC (Russian Kettlebell) plank, which means total contraction of the body in a plank position 10 to 15 seconds at a time, Dead Bugs or Bird Dogs. “These drills are great because they help you learn to move around a solid midsection, while still breathing naturally,” Mosher says.

Go Through the Motions: Before going hard, you should try out the equipment you plan to use for the day. “You can always start with body-weight exercises first, like push-ups for bench day or body-weight squats for squat day.” And once you finish body-weight drills, you can progress to an empty bar, and then add weights incrementally as you need them. “There should always be two to three warmup sets before you start your working load for the day,” Mosher says. “This is the time to really focus on hammering good form, making sure you are moving as fluidly and perfectly as possible.” Once these sets are done, you’re ready to roll.

via popsugar.com

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

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Bust a Gut on the Treadmill

by Jari Love

You know that time spent on the treadmill gives you a great cardio workout, but did you know that it can actually be even more effective than pumping iron for getting rid of belly fat? That’s great news for people who hate weight training but don’t mind hopping on the treadmill a few times a week.

 Belly fat isn’t quite like arm flab or butt sag. It’s far more dangerous, because it’s actually packed around your body’s internal organs. It’s linked to various types of cancer, as well as cardiovascular problems and type 2 diabetes, and it’s believed to contribute to premature death.

 According to Time Magazine, a new study conducted by Duke University researchers monitored 196 overweight, sedentary adults ranging in age from 18-70. They divided them randomly into a group that did three sets of weight training (8-12 reps for 3 days a week), another that jogged 12 miles each week at a heart rate of 80%, and another that did both weight training and aerobics. At the end of 8 months the aerobic/weight training group lost noticeable amounts of belly fat. The group that did aerobic training alone had the same results! What about the benefit to the weight training group? There was no significant benefit.

 Clearly, the humble treadmill is one of the best ways you can exercise to lose that dangerous belly fat. And not only will it help you reduce your waistline, it’s great for your overall health as well. Regular aerobic exercise helps you lose weight, and the cardio benefits help lower your risk of heart attacks and strokes.

 For the most effective treadmill workout, switch it up from time to time. Interval training, which consists of short, intense periods of running or jogging on an incline followed by a slower pace, helps you ratchet up your calorie burn rate so you melt off the fat quickly. As long as your body feels challenged, you’re getting it right.

 To maximize the benefits of your treadmill workout, you should also follow a healthy diet, rich in fruits, vegetables, and lean protein. Remember to drink lots of water – it helps you stay properly hydrated and aids in flushing toxins from your body. Don’t try to lose weight too quickly. Usually two pounds per week is a safe goal, and you can reach it just by doing thirty minutes on the treadmill each day!

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

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HIIT

by Jari Love

Lately we have talked a lot about HIIT, mainly because it is so popular right now in the fitness industry. Read this article to understand if HIIT is the be-all-end-all to workouts or if you should use variety in your workouts to get maximum fat loss results. If you love HIIT workouts because they save you time, I’ve included my favourite 30 minute HIIT workout for you! But with all HIIT workouts, you should ease into it, and always warm up. If you’re a beginner, try one of my early on workouts like the Get RIPPED DVD to ease into it. This article does have some interesting points to make on HIIT.

 If you’re at all interested in fitness, then chances are you’ve heard of high-intensity interval training, otherwise referred to as HIIT. Perhaps you’ve read about it online, seen it discussed in your favorite fitness magazine, or simply heard others talking about it at your local gym. Whatever the case may be, there’s a good chance what you heard sounded something like, “HIIT is the only way to burn fat” or “If you aren’t doing HIIT, you’re wasting your time in the gym.” Or maybe it said, “Steady-state cardio doesn’t burn fat — HIIT does, and there’s no other way to train.”

 We are being bombarded with statements like these, and they’ve led everyone to jump on the HIIT bandwagon. If you’re going to the gym, you’re doing HIIT. It’s that simple. But, is HIIT right for you?

 It’s important to question what you read and hear about HIIT, because most of these sources don’t have your best interests in mind. Is HIIT really worth the hype? Let’s look at a few factors that may make you think otherwise.

Let’s get one thing straight. HIIT is the most intense form of exercise you can do. This is what brings forth the benefits it has to offer. For some people, this is great. Intensity is the name of their game and they are fully prepared to go that extra mile and put in that level of work.

 For others, it’s a recipe for disaster. Take your average gym-goer as an example. They’ve just started their workout routine. They likely went to the gym because they have 20 pounds to lose — or more — and are ready to finally do something about it. Prior to joining, their activity level consisted of little more than getting up to look for food in the fridge or going for a walk here and there, but only when they found a burst of motivation.

 These are usually the type of people who love instant gratification. After all, instant gratification is what got them in this position in the first place. The cake was tastier than the apple, and therefore it’s what they ate. Now, they have this excess weight and are looking to get it off pronto. They aren’t looking to take the long journey to weight loss. So, when they hear that HIIT is the fastest way to burn fat, they jump onboard.

 

The issue with this is they aren’t actually ready to jump onboard. They’re out of shape and need a slow and steady approach, not one that calls for 110 percent of their effort at a near-maximal pace. Unaware of this fact, many attempt HIIT anyway — and then one of three things happens:

 They become injured — HIIT will put you at a higher risk of injury if it’s not done properly.

   Or, they try it, hit those intensity levels, and hate it so much they leave the gym forever.

 For these reasons, a person who wishes to lose weight shouldn’t go down the HIIT route. Instead, they should get started on the exact type of exercise they’re apprehensive about: steady-state cardio training. This type of exercise will help them build up their fitness levels to the point that they feel comfortable moving on to HIIT sessions successfully.

 Another often unaddressed issue with HIIT is that it’s very taxing on the central nervous system.  Any form of high-intensity exercise, whether it’s HIIT cardio training or weight lifting activities, is going to wear you down.

 The problem with this is HIIT is often emphasized as being the only way to burn fat, so people who are highly motivated attempt three to four sessions per week. Then, they pair that with three to four sessions of intense weightlifting per week. While they might sustain this regimen for a few weeks, their body will eventually grow tired. Some people will even see this fatigue as a sign they aren’t training hard enough and begin upping the intensity even more.

 HIIT can be good if you are at a fitness level where it’s possible, and even then, it should be performed in moderation. A balance between rest, recovery, and intense training will lead to optimal results, but many people aren’t able to do this successfully.

 Finally, you might want to forgo HIIT training if you’re on a low-carb diet. When it comes to weight loss, diet will always trump exercise in terms of the results that can be seen. It’s just far easier to cut calories than it is to burn them off in the gym.

 Therefore, diet should be priority number one. But if you happen to be on a reduced-carb diet — one that’s been proven effective in burning fat — you might not have the necessary fuel to complete HIIT.

 HIIT is an anaerobic form of exercise, meaning that the body needs fuel in the form of glucose to get through it. If you are taking in a limited amount of carbohydrates, there simply won’t be enough glucose to fuel your workout, especially if you’re doing strength training too.

 This will cause your performance to falter and you won’t hit the intensity levels you’re aiming for, even if you have the best intentions. When this happens, you have two options: you can either add more carbs to your diet plan or replace HIIT with a lower intensity form of aerobic cardio that uses fat as a fuel source. For many people, the likelier option to choose is the second one. It’ll keep their low-carb diet intact and they’ll only have to adjust their exercise plan.

 There’s no denying that HIIT can be highly beneficial when performed under the right circumstances. Unfortunately, it simply isn’t ideal for everyone. Don’t fall for the hype that HIIT is the only right way to train. That just isn’t the case.

 Try this workout for a 30 minute HIIT workout:

 1 minute of each exercise and repeat the whole thing 3 times. Start with a 3 minute warmup and end with 3 minutes of stretching. I’ve got higher intense moves in brackets for those more advanced.

    Squats (jump squats)

    High knee runs

    Push-ups (on toes and go all the way down to till your chest hits the ground)

    Skater jumps

    Alternating lunges (jump lunges)

    Jumping jacks

    Bicycle Abs

    Mountain climbers

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

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At Home Workouts

by Jari Love

At home workouts are taking over

Don’t have the income necessary for a gym membership? Not interested in being around a lot of toned and experienced fitness buffs? Maybe you just don’t like the idea of heading into a club or center to get exercise? No worries because there are many ways that you can start enjoying at home workouts that can give you the same tone, definition, or results that you thought available only at a gym.

 Equipment – You don’t need to sink a lot of money into equipment for fitness and exercise. While you could go online and use auction sites or local resources to find used gym gear, you can also find a lot of alternative solutions and affordable options. For example, a lot of people create their own “kettlebell” weights using a one gallon milk jug. They fill it to the level they want in order to get various weights. A lot of people also find that investing in a good set of fitness bands or resistance bands is far more flexible than a set of weights. For instance, one woman would use her fitness bands each time she went to the playground with her kids. She did assisted pull ups and lifts with them and spent only a small amount to get very durable gear.

 Space – Whether you are going to do a lot of strength training or cardio “at home” you probably don’t need to convert an entire room into a gym. You can just measure out a safe area that allows you to perform moves such as burpees, jumping rope, and lunges. When you have enough room to swing your arms and extend your body, you also have enough room to sprint in place, and do all of the floor work required. You can even purchase gym mats that will help to reduce noise or prevent slipping.

 Routines – This is where a lot of people “feel” the difference between a gym and an at home workout. However, with the Internet, streaming media, and an enormous number of articles and resources, you can begin to develop routines that are safe and effective. You won’t miss the gym experience at all and you can often find information for free or at very affordable prices – including DVD sets for special routines.

 You can easily do at home workouts of any kind. You don’t have to commit a lot of money to the process, and yet you too can start to have a toned and strong body in a very short time.

 Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

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Detox Teas

by Jari Love

4 Things You Should Know About Detox Teas

I can’t walk through a mall without seeing ads or being physically stopped by someone asking to try a detox tea. I know we are obsessed with losing weight and losing weight fast, but is a detox tea the way to go? I found this article that explains my thoughts quite nicely. Read this before buying a detox tea…

So-called “detox” teas have been popular for years, primarily among people who frequent health-food stores, or consult with alternative practitioners. These days, though, they’ve become big business, and a handful of celebrities are touting their weight-loss benefits on social media. In a way, detox teas have become the liquid version of waist trainers—the before and after results are often dramatic, and their celeb backing generates buzz, but you may be wondering: Do they really work, and are they safe? Before you plunk down your hard-earned money and start sipping, here are four things you should know.

You still have to diet and exercise for them to work. One detox tea brand, recently Instagrammed by Amber Rose, advises per their website that for “best results,” the tea should be consumed along with plenty of water, healthy, balanced meals, and three to five workouts a week. Another, which has been Instagrammed by several celebs, including Kourtney Kardashian, Christina Milian, and Hilary Duff, states online that the tea “…is recommended to be taken in conjunction with a healthy energy-controlled diet and regular exercise” and the website offers an accompanying meal plan for sale. Personally, I’d love to see a study comparing outcomes generated by a detox tea compared to a placebo, with both groups following the exact same eating plan, but I haven’t found any.

That makes it difficult to know whether the weight-loss results people are getting from these teas are actually due to drinking them, or simply the result of a cleaned-up diet and consistent workout routine, which we already know can lead to weight loss. In any case, simply sipping detox tea while continuing to skip the gym and order takeout is unlikely to help you shrink your shape.

You might lose water weight, not actual fat. Detox teas that combine caffeine with diuretics can trigger the loss of water weight. Just two cups of water weighs one pound on a scale, so shedding fluid can make you look and feel lighter—even if you haven’t lost an ounce of body fat. Detox teas can also trigger a laxative effect, which causes your body to eliminate waste from your GI tract, another result that can make your stomach flatter, and allow you to feel lighter, even if your lean-to-fat ratio remains exactly the same.

If this quick-fix effect gives you the confidence boost and motivation you need to start eating healthier and working out—the real keys to getting healthy and lean—terrific (assuming the teas are even safe to drink—see below). Just remember: If you go back to your former less-than-stellar eating or exercise habits, or stop drinking the tea, you can gain the weight right back just as quick as you dropped it.

They may interfere with sleep. Most detox teas contain caffeine, probably because this stimulant may suppress appetite, trigger your digestive system to let go of waste, and help you shed water weight. A caffeine-induced energy boost may also lead to working out a little longer or harder than usual.

However, too much caffeine can also be risky (see above) and interfere with getting enough sleep—and catching too few zzzs may ultimately undo the tea’s weight-loss effects. In fact, too little shuteye has been shown to trigger excessive eating and weight gain and even slow metabolism, which can make it easier to gain weight even if you don’t eat extra calories. A good rule of thumb, regardless of where your caffeine is coming from, is to nix it at least six hours before bed. And if you’re trying to shed pounds, commit to making adequate sleep a top priority.

The research on detox teas is scant. While there are some published studies on various ingredients often found in detox teas, I haven’t seen any research on the teas themselves, particularly in the precise formulas they’re prescribed (that research isn’t required for the teas to be sold, by the way).

That means that using detox teas leaves unanswered questions about if and how they work, how they should be used, how much may be too much, and possibly who shouldn’t use them. If you’re unsure, or are planning to start drinking them, talk to your doctor, nutritionist, or health care provider. Just be sure he or she doesn’t have a vested interest in the sale of the product you’re considering: If they happen to be selling or endorsing it, seek a second opinion. Via greatideas.people.com

 

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

By Collage Video | | exercise, Jari Love, tips, Weekly Blog, Wellness | 0 comments | Read more

Creative Partner Workouts

by Jari Love

Creative Partner Workouts with Bands and Balls

Creative 8-move partner workouts with bands and balls!

Playing with resistance bands and stability balls at the gym is a little like enjoying an adult-approved recess. And the only thing that makes playground time more fun? Sharing it with a friend.

Grab the Thelma to your Louise, a stability ball and resistance band, and put yourselves through the paces. Your muscles may scream as you do each exercise, but you’ll be laughing so hard you’ll hardly notice.

Perform the series of exercises as a circuit, then repeat two or three more times.

  1. Resistance run

Wrap a resistance band around Thelma’s torso, gripping each end of the band. Step a few feet back, planting your feet slightly wider than hip-distance apart. Sink down into a squat, pressing your hips back and keeping your weight in your heels. Extend your arms fully in front of you and engage your core.

Once you’re in place, tell Thelma to “go!” She runs in place against the resistance of the band — you’re keeping her from running away — for 60 seconds.

Switch roles and repeat.

  1. Stability ball squat

Place a stability ball between you and your buddy, so you’re both leaning your backs into the ball. It can be a little tough to find the right balance, so be sure to talk to one another to make sure you both feel reasonably stable. Step your feet out slightly in front of you, your weight in your heels. On the count of three, both of you bend your knees and press your backs further into the ball to sink down into a squat. Talk to one another to stay in sync! When you’ve gone as low as you can into the squat, reverse the movement: Press into your heels with your back pushing against the ball and return to standing.

Continue for 60 seconds.

  1. Chest press and row

Stand a few feet in front of Thelma, gripping the ends of a resistance band in each hand so the center is looped behind you. Thelma should grab the center of the band with both hands about chest-distance apart — her arms extended forward at shoulder height. Starting with your fists at your shoulders, palms facing down, press against the resistance of the band and extend your arms fully in front of your chest. Return to your starting position.

Once you’re done with your chest press, prepare yourself to provide resistance for your partner. Engage your core and lean slightly forward, keeping your fists steady at your shoulders. Thelma squeezes her shoulder blades together, drawing her elbows back as she pulls the band to her chest.

Continue this chest press and row exercise for 60 seconds before switching roles.

  1. Stability ball lunge

This one takes communication, so be sure to talk with your partner!

Place a stability ball on the ground between you and Thelma — both of you turned with your back to the ball. There should be a couple feet of space between your feet and the ball. Working as a team, each of you should reach your right leg behind you, placing your right foot on top of the ball. Check your balance, centering your weight on the heel of your left foot.

When you’re both reasonably steady, bend both knees, lowering your torso toward the ground while maintaining a strong core. When you’ve gone as far as you can, try to keep your front knee aligned with your front toe, press through your heel and press yourself back to standing.

Continue for 30 seconds before switching legs.

  1. Superman lats and biceps curl

This one’s especially fun, and when you’re in the superman position, it really works the entire back side of your body.

Lie on the ground on your stomach with Thelma kneeling a few feet in front of you — gripping the ends of the band in each hand, her upper arms tight to her sides, her elbows bent and palms facing up. Reach forward, grabbing the center of the band with your palms down about shoulder-width apart. The band should be taut between you.

Tighten your core and lift your hands and feet up off the ground in a “superman” position. Tighten your upper back and shoulders and draw your shoulder blades together with your elbows bending out laterally from your body as you pull the band to your chest. Reverse the movement and extend your arms.

From this position, prepare to provide resistance for Thelma’s biceps curl. As you hold your hands steady, Thelma engages her core. While keeping her upper arms “glued” to her sides, she bends her elbows and pulls against the resistance of the band to draw her fists to her shoulders. She then returns to the starting position.

Continue for 60 seconds before switching roles.

  1. Squat and triceps extension

Stand a few feet behind your buddy. She should stand tall, feet hip-distance apart, her arms extended overhead while holding the ends of a resistance band in each hand. The center of the resistance band should hang behind her. Grasp the center of the resistance band, pulling it taut at shoulder height with your arms extended in front of you.

From this position, Thelma bends her elbows behind her, keeping her upper arms close to her ears. Once she’s set, squat down by pressing your hips behind you with your weight in your heels, pulling the resistance with you as you keep your arms steady at shoulder height.

When you return to standing, prepare to provide resistance for your friend. Tighten your core and work to maintain your arms at shoulder height. Thelma then uses her triceps to press up against the resistance band, extending her arms overhead without allowing her elbows to bend out to the sides.

Continue for 60 seconds before switching positions.

  1. Stability ball plank

You’re going to get up close and personal for this one — be sure to communicate throughout the exercise.

Kneel on the ground with a stability ball between your partner and yourself. Lean forward as a unit, placing your forearms against the ball. Press into the ball for support and step your feet behind you so your weight is balanced on the balls of your feet and your forearms. Your body should form a straight line.

Pull your core tight and hold the position for 60 seconds.

  1. Stability ball sit-ups

Sit on the ground with your knees bent and your heels touching the ground with the balls of your feet pressing into Thelma’s. Holding a stability ball in your hands, engage your core and roll back onto the ground, reaching the stability ball behind you before reversing the movement as you use your abs to pull yourself back to sitting. As you come to sitting, toss the stability ball to your partner so she can perform the same sit-up.

Continue alternating sit-ups for 60 seconds.

via sheknows.com

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

By Collage Video | | Abs, cardio, exercise, Healthy, Jari Love, tips, Weekly Blog, Wellness | 0 comments | Read more

Booty Sculpting Moves

by Jari Love

Squats have their place in strength training, but there are plenty of other butt exercises out there! Mix up your routine, and try out the following moves that tone and lift your derrière. Who knows? You might say so long to squats (for now) and find a new favorite exercise in the bunch.

  1. Single-Leg Forward Reach

Similar to yoga’s Warrior 3, this exercise fires up your core by challenging your balance. As you move in and out of the pose, you will be working the back of your body too.

– Stand with all your weight in your left foot, abs engaged and chest lifted.

– Reach your torso forward as you lift your right leg behind you. Reach your arms out in front of you for balance as your torso and leg come parallel to the floor.

– Hold this position for a moment, and reach through your right heel to engage the back of the right leg.

– Moving in one piece, lower your right leg toward the floor as you return to standing upright, resting the right foot lightly on the ground. This completes one rep.

– Do 15 reps before switching sides.

  1. Side Lunge to Curtsy

Target your outer tush and your inner thighs with this move.

– Holding a dumbbell in your right hand, side lunge to the left, bringing your right hand to your left foot. Lower your booty as much as possible. Keep your toes pointed forward and your left knee bent to no more than 90 degrees.

– Push off gently with your left foot, and come into a curtsy position with your left leg crossing behind your left as you press your weight overhead. Keep your hips square and your curtsy tight. Both feet should be pointed forward. This completes one rep.

– Repeat by stepping immediately into a side lunge from the curtsy.

– Once you have completed 12 to 15 reps, switch sides. Do three sets total.

  1. Crossover Lunge

Adding arm work to this glute- and inner-thigh-toner makes this a time-saving full-body move.

– Stand with your feet shoulder-distance apart. Grasp a dumbbell or a medicine ball in front of you with arms extended.

– Take a large step diagonally forward with your left foot, planting your foot at the 11 o’clock position. Sink down until your thighs form right angles. As you bend your knees, curl the dumbbell toward your chest.

– Extend your legs, lift your left knee and bring it in toward your chest, and lower your arms. Step back with your left leg, this time lunging behind your torso and stepping back to the 8 o’clock position. As you sink down into the reverse lunge, complete another bicep curl. This completes one rep. Complete your set, and then switch sides.

– A set equals 15 to 20 reps on each leg. Do two sets.

  1. Tipping Row

This rowing variation works the backside beautifully, but it also targets the hamstrings and upper back.

– Stand up straight and hold two dumbbells with palms facing each other.

– Lift up your left foot so you are balancing on your right leg. Find your balance, then sweep your left leg back and extend your arms toward the floor.

– Holding this position, bend your elbows back so that the dumbbells meet the sides of your chest. Keep your shoulders down and elbows straight back.

– Do three sets of 10, then repeat with the other leg.

  1. Single-Leg Deadlift With Kettlebell

The single-leg deadlift not only works your backside, targeting both the hamstring and the glutes but also works the core.

– Hold a kettlebell (between 10 and 20 pounds) in your right hand, and lift your left foot slightly off the ground.

– Keeping your back neutral, lean your entire torso forward while raising your left leg, which should stay in line with your body. The kettlebell will lower toward the ground. Keep your left shoulder blade pulled down your back.

– With your back straight, return upright, coming to your starting position. This completes one rep. Maximize this move by keeping your right foot off the ground as you go through your reps.

– Do 12 reps on each leg, for three sets.

For images of the above exercises and for 8 more glute exercises that aren’t squats, visit popsugar.com!

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

By Collage Video | | fitness, Jari Love, tips, Weekly Blog, Wellness | 0 comments | Read more

Broccoli Tater Tots

by Jari Love

If you love the texture of tater tots but are trying to cut back on calories and fat, these broccoli tots need to make their way onto your table. This quick and simple recipe comes together in 25 minutes and will curb those fried-potato cravings with a much lighter bite that’s lower in carbs, calories, and fat.
Your taste buds thank you in advance for this broccoli-cheesy treat.
Broccoli-Cheese Tater Tots
Ingredients:
2 cups broccoli florets
1 small shallot, minced
2/3 shredded cheddar cheese
1/2 cup panko bread crumbs
2 eggs
Salt and pepper
Directions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 400ºF, and line a baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper.
  2. Steam your broccoli florets for 2 minutes, and chop well into small pieces.
  3. In a large bowl, combine the chopped broccoli with the rest of your ingredients. Mix until totally combined.
  4. Scoop a large spoonful of the mixture in your hands, and shape it so it resembles a tater tot. Place on your baking sheet, and repeat until all mixture has been used.
  5. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes, and enjoy warm from the oven.

via popsugar.com

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

By Collage Video | | fitness, holiday, Jari Love, Recipe, tips, Weekly Blog, Wellness | 0 comments | Read more

High-Protein Foods to Add to Your Diet

by Jari Love

High-Protein Foods to Add to Your Diet – Nutrition

Although most of us have adequate protein in our western diet, the trend towards choosing higher protein foods continues. Restaurants are beginning to cater for those who follow the popular Paleo diet, meaning that protein-rich dishes are appearing more frequently on menus as demand continues to rise.

 

What can you do if you want to increase your protein content?

 

Start with some basic food swaps:

 

  1. Change your ordinary yoghurt to Greek yoghurt

 

Greek yoghurt contains around 10 grams of protein per 100 grams, compared with just 3.8 grams per 100 grams in ordinary yoghurt. Choose plain varieties rather than sugar-laden flavoured versions and sweeten with fresh fruit.

 

  1. Swap white rice for quinoa or buckwheat

 

Both quinoa and buckwheat are referred to as complete sources of protein because they each contain all 9 essential amino acids (ones that the human body cannot make). Both also contain around 14 grams of protein per 100 gram serving, which is twice the protein content of rice.

 

  1. Have eggs for breakfast instead of your usual cereal

 

One egg contains around 6 grams of high quality protein and is also a complete protein source. Try boiled eggs with buttered toast soldiers in place of a sugary breakfast cereal.

 

  1. Go for a salad with cottage cheese at lunchtime in place of a sandwich

 

Cottage cheese has a slightly higher protein content than Greek yoghurt, with around 12 grams per 100 gram serving. It is also a complete source of protein and a versatile food that goes with anything. Choose low sodium and low fat varieties.

 

  1. Try using ground up nuts and seeds as a higher protein alternative to breadcrumbs

 

Sunflower, pumpkin and sesame seeds each have between 18 and 21 grams of protein per 100 gram serving, as do nuts such as almonds and cashews. A ground-up mix of these can be used to coat chicken pieces or fish, as a higher protein replacement for breadcrumbs which average just 13 grams of protein per 100 grams.

 

  1. Nuts and seeds are a much healthier and higher protein snack than a packet of crisps

 

With their high protein content, nuts and seeds are much healthier than high in fat (and salt) potato crisps that average only 7 grams of protein per 100 gram portion.

 

  1. We all love French fries but vegetable chips make a great alternative

 

French fries or chips are high in fat and contain around 41 grams of carbohydrate per 100 gram serving. With only 10 grams of carbohydrate per 100 grams, vegetable fries are a much healthier alternative. You could try a mix of carrots, sweet potatoes, courgettes and beetroots and, for the healthiest option, roast them in the oven rather than deep frying.

 

  1. Thirsty? Go for a glass of milk instead of juice or soda

 

Milk has 3.4 grams of protein per 100 grams compared with just 0.1 grams in 100 grams of apple juice. It has half the amount of sugar too.

 

  1. Swap mashed potato for vegetable mash, noodles for zucchini or squash “noodles” and rice for cauliflower “rice”

 

Vegetable noodles provide a healthier, lower carbohydrate alternative to ordinary noodles, with 3.1 grams of carbohydrate in the courgette version versus 25 grams per 100 grams in egg noodles.

 

As well as making small food swaps there are other ways you can increase your protein intake, such as adding lentils and beans to casseroles. You can also add seeds, such as sunflower and pumpkin, to salads for an extra crunch. The addition of protein powder and dark green veg, such as spinach and kale, to smoothies makes for an effective post workout boost.

 

As with any food, the principle of everything in moderation applies here. Too much protein can equate to excess calories, which of course will lead to weight gain. Be aware of portion sizes and use lean meat with the fat trimmed off. Spread out your protein intake throughout the day and remember protein takes longer to digest so you don’t need as much of it. In other words it can keep you feeling fuller for longer. As with any diet, variety is key so mix up your proteins too. A range of white meat, red meat, seafood, dairy and vegetable proteins, such as quinoa, tofu and buckwheat, will help ensure that you eat a complete range of essential amino acids.

 

Jari Love – original creator of Get RIPPED! DVD series and group exercise classes. The hot-selling and critically acclaimed Get RIPPED! series enables individuals of any fitness level to burn up to three times more calories than the traditional weight-training program, and has received rave reviews from fitness critics throughout North America since the first title debuted in late 2005.

By Collage Video | | cardio, exercise, fitness, Jari Love, Recipe, tips, Weekly Blog, Wellness | 0 comments | Read more
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