Healthy Tips & Recipes by Gilad

Posts in the Thanksgiving category

Creamy Mushroom Soup Recipe

by Gilad

Mushrooms have the ability to help boost your immune system, providing you with numerous vitamins, minerals, and enzymes.
Their hearty, earthy flavors become the star in a soul-warming soup like this!

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 onion, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • ½ tsp finely chopped ginger
  • 60g (2 ¼ oz/ 1 cup) broccoli, roughly chopped
  • 450g (1 lb/ 1 bunch) English spinach
  • 600g (1 lb 5 oz/ 1 bunch) bok choy (pak choy)
  • 155g (5 ½ oz/ 1 cup) diced butternut pumpkin (squash)
  • 1 litre (35 fl oz/ 4 cups) vegetable stock
  • 250ml (9 fl oz/ 1 cup) coconut milk
  • 1 tbsp nutritional yeast flakes, to serve 

DIRECTIONS

  1. In a large pot over medium-high heat, sauté onion, garlic and mushrooms. 
  2. Add thyme, coconut cream and stock, simmer for 10-15 minutes.
  3. Remove soup from heat, and allow soup to slightly cool, then blend (in blender or food processor) in batches until you have a smooth puree. 
  4. Taste and add salt and pepper if needed.

by Rachel Morrow   www.foodmatters.com

 

Gilad also has an Ask Gilad Blog here at Collage Video! Have a question for Gilad? Click HERE and send it in! Gilad will choose one question each week to answer.

Find out more information about Gilad and his Fitness DVD's HERE.

By Collage Video | | Ask Gilad, Gilad, holiday, Recipe, Thanksgiving, tips, Weekly Blog | 0 comments | Read more

Sugarless Cranberry Sauce Recipe

by Gilad

For your Thanksgiving Table  

 

Cranberry sauce was a staple at the Thanksgiving table when I was a kid, though it usually came out of a can. Then, at some point, we started making it, but the recipe called for a lot of sugar! For those who haven't tried them, plain cranberries are very tart, so I wasn't sure this recipe would be able to be made healthy, but some other delicious fruits filled in the gaps. It does have more natural sugars than we normally eat, but is a healthier option to the ones that actually contain sugar.

Prep time 15 min. Cook time 15 min. Total time 30 min.

A homemade alternative to store-bought cranberry sauce with delicious hints of pineapple and orange to complement the flavor!

Ingredients

  • 2 bags of fresh cranberries (they are usually 12 ounce bags)
  • ¾ cup pineapple juice or orange juice (I recommend pineapple!)
  • ½ cup of applesauce (no sugar added)
  • ½ cup of water
  • juice and zest of one orange
  • 3 to 4 Tablespoons of honey or to taste (optional)

Instructions

  1. Put cranberries, pineapple juice, applesauce and water in a sauce pan and bring to a boil.
  2. Keep on medium heat, stirring constantly until the cranberries start to explode (about 10-15 minutes).
  3. Reduce to a simmer and pour the juice and zest over the cranberry mixture.
  4. Simmer 10-15 minutes and remove from heat.
  5. Cool completely and store in fridge at least 4 hours but preferably overnight before serving.
NOTE: This is not as sweet as store versions! Taste at the end of cooking. It is naturally sweet from the fruit juice and applesauce but you can add more honey or agave to taste if needed.

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    Turkey: Pros, Cons and Tips!

    by Gilad

    Thanksgiving is just around the corner
    So let's look at TURKEY from an Australian point of view!
    Meat is a valuable source of protein and other nutrients. But when it comes to a healthy diet, it's important to choose the right kind of meat and eat the correct portion size. The Australian Guide To Healthy Eating recommends we eat one serving of meat per day, the equivalent of 65 to 100 grams of cooked meat.

    Turkey meat is sold in various forms, including whole, prepackaged slices, breast, thighs, mince, cutlets and tenderloins. Turkeys are not native to Australia (today's domestic turkey is a descendant of the wild turkey native to northern Mexico and the eastern US) and turkey farming is significantly different from other poultry farming. However, turkey consumption is growing. This year each Australian will have consumed an average of 1.7 kilograms of turkey meat, and the Australasian Turkey Federation estimates this will grow to 2.5 kilograms by 2011. 

    The pros

    • Turkey is a rich source of protein.
    • Skinless turkey is low in fat. White meat is lower in kilojoules and has less fat than the dark meat. A typical turkey consists of 70 per cent white meat and 30 per cent dark meat.
    • Turkey meat is a source of iron, zinc, potassium and phosphorus.
    • It is also a source of vitamin B6 and niacin, which are both essential for the body's energy production.
    • Regular turkey consumption can help lower cholesterol levels. The meat is low-GI and can help keep insulin levels stable.
    • Turkey contains the amino acid tryptophan, which produces serotonin and plays an important role in strengthening the immune system.
    • It is also a source of selenium, which is essential for thyroid hormone metabolism. It also boosts immunity and acts as an antioxidant.
    The cons
    • Turkey can be high in sodium.
    • Some meat, particularly prepackaged slices, can be processed and contain other substances.
    • Turkey skin is high in fat.
    • Research suggests large amounts of tryptophan can make you sleepy.
    Turkey tips
    • If you can, buy organic. Turkeys raised organically will have been treated humanely and are less likely to contain pesticides and herbicides.
    • Look for meat that is supple.
    • A turkey roast is cooked properly when it is piping hot all the way through.
    • Turkey dries out quickly, so don't overcook it.
    • If marinating turkey meat, put it in the fridge straight after you've finished, as it is highly sensitive to heat.
    • Store turkey separate from any gravy, stuffing or raw food.
    • Refrigerated turkey will keep for about one or two days. If it is already cooked, it will keep for about four days.

    Gilad also has an Ask Gilad Blog here at Collage Video! Have a question for Gilad? Click HERE and send it in! Gilad will choose one question each week to answer.

    Find out more information about Gilad and his Fitness DVD's HERE.

    By Collage Video | | Gilad, goals, Healthy, Lord of the Abs, Thanksgiving, Weekly Blog, Wellness | 0 comments | Read more

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